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International migration, income taxes and transfers: a welfare analysis

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  • Michael, Michael S.

Abstract

An important issue in public policy debates is the effect of international migration on welfare in source and host countries. We address this issue by constructing a general equilibrium model of a two-class source or host country. Each country produces many traded and non-traded goods, uses income taxes and distributes the tax receipts equally to all individuals. The analysis examines the effects of permanent migration on class, and national welfare. We show, among other things, that marginal immigration hurts people already in the country regardless of whether or not non-traded goods exist. The presence of international capital mobility, however, may reverse the above result.
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  • Michael, Michael S., 2003. "International migration, income taxes and transfers: a welfare analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 401-411, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:72:y:2003:i:1:p:401-411
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    1. Rivera-Batiz, Francisco L., 1982. "International migration, non-traded goods and economic welfare in the source country," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 81-90.
    2. Razin, Assaf & Sadka, Efraim, 1995. "Resisting Migration: Wage Rigidity and Income Distribution," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 312-316, May.
    3. Berry, R Albert & Soligo, Ronald, 1969. "Some Welfare Aspects of International Migration," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 77(5), pages 778-794, Sept./Oct.
    4. M. G. Quibria, 1988. "On Generalizing the Economic Analysis of International Migration: A Note," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 21(4), pages 874-876, November.
    5. David E. Wildasin, 1994. "Income Redistribution and Migration," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 27(3), pages 637-656, August.
    6. Wellisch, Dietmar & Walz, Uwe, 1998. "Why do rich countries prefer free trade over free migration? The role of the modern welfare state," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 42(8), pages 1595-1612, September.
    7. Djajic, Slobodan, 1998. "Emigration and welfare in an economy with foreign capital," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 433-445.
    8. Wellisch, Dietmar & Wildasin, David E., 1996. "Decentralized income redistribution and immigration," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 187-217, January.
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    1. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00544332 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. PaweĊ‚ Kaczmarczyk, 2013. "Are immigrants a burden for the state budget? Review paper," RSCAS Working Papers 2013/79, European University Institute.
    3. Kemnitz, Alexander, 2003. "Unemployment, Technology and the Welfare Effects of Immigration," Discussion Papers 611, Institut fuer Volkswirtschaftslehre und Statistik, Abteilung fuer Volkswirtschaftslehre.
    4. Luo, Xiaohu & Caron, Justin & Karplus, Valerie J. & Zhang, Da & Zhang, Xiliang, 2016. "Interprovincial migration and the stringency of energy policy in China," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 164-173.
    5. Udo Kreickemeier & Michael S. Michael, "undated". "Unemployment and the Immigration Surplus," Discussion Papers 08/31, University of Nottingham, GEP.
    6. Jean J. Gabszewicz & Skerdilajda Zanaj, 2014. "Migration: a burden or a blessing for natives?," CREA Discussion Paper Series 14-01, Center for Research in Economic Analysis, University of Luxembourg.
    7. Panos Hatzipanayotou & Michael S. Michael, 2005. "Migration, Tied Foreign Aid and the Welfare State," CESifo Working Paper Series 1497, CESifo Group Munich.
    8. Kaczmarczyk, Pawel, 2015. "Burden or Relief? Fiscal Impacts of Recent Ukrainian Migration to Poland," IZA Discussion Papers 8779, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    9. Michael S. Michael, 2006. "Are Migration Policies that Induce Skilled (Unskilled) Migration Beneficial (Harmful) for the Host Country?," CESifo Working Paper Series 1814, CESifo Group Munich.

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    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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