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Job and wage mobility in a search model with non-compliance (exemptions) with the minimum wage

Author

Listed:
  • Eckstein, Zvi
  • Ge, Suqin
  • Petrongolo, Barbara

Abstract

We use a simple job search model to explain the doubling of mean hourly earnings of white males, and the five-fold increase in their variance, during the first 18 years of labor market experience. For this purpose we embody minimum wage regulations and imperfect compliance in a job search model encompassing job mobility and on-the-job wage growth as potential sources of wage dynamics. The model is estimated by simulated GMM using data from the NLSY79. Our estimated model provides a good fit for the observed levels and trends of the main job and wage mobility data, and in particular it replicates very well the increase in the first and second moments of the wage distribution over the life cycle, as well as the fall in the fraction of workers paid below the minimum wage. Our estimates imply that job mobility explains between one third and one half of the observed wage growth. Counterfactual experiments of increases in the minimum wage and/or compliance deliver small effects on both the actual wage distribution and the nonemployment rate.

Suggested Citation

  • Eckstein, Zvi & Ge, Suqin & Petrongolo, Barbara, 2006. "Job and wage mobility in a search model with non-compliance (exemptions) with the minimum wage," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 4961, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:4961
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Guerrazzi, Marco, 2016. "Wage and employment determination in a dynamic insider-outsider model," MPRA Paper 74759, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    minimum wages; compliance; exemptions; job search; wage growth;

    JEL classification:

    • J42 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Monopsony; Segmented Labor Markets
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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