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The Effects of Official English Laws on Limited-English-Proficient Workers

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  • Zavodny, Madeline

Abstract

Workers with limited English skills may suffer adverse effects when states declare English the official language. If employers believe official English laws allow or require them to adopt workplace English-only rules that lower the demand for limited-English-proficient workers, such laws may harm individuals who do not speak English well. Using data from the 1980 and 1990 censuses, I estimate whether the earnings of limited-English-proficient workers who live in states that adopted official English laws declined relative to other workers. The results suggest a substantial decline in the annual earnings of men with limited English proficiency. Copyright 2000 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Zavodny, Madeline, 2000. "The Effects of Official English Laws on Limited-English-Proficient Workers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(3), pages 427-452, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:18:y:2000:i:3:p:427-52
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Maya N. Federman & David E. Harrington & Kathy J. Krynski, 2006. "The Impact of State Licensing Regulations on Low-Skilled Immigrants: The Case of Vietnamese Manicurists," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 237-241, May.
    2. Do, Chau & Gonzalez, Arturo, 2015. "Hispanic brokers and borrowers: The effect of language affinity on the price of home mortgages," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 77-86.

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