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Does Education Reduce the Risk of Hypertension? Estimating the Biomarker Effect of Compulsory Schooling in England

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  • Nattavudh Powdthavee

Abstract

This paper estimates the exogenous effect of schooling on reducedincidence of hypertension. Using the changes in the minimum school-leavingage law in the United Kingdom from age 14 to 15 in 1947 and from age15 to 16 in 1973 as sources of exogenous variation in schooling, theregression discontinuity and instrumental variable probit estimatesimply that, for the first law change in 1947, completing an extrayear of schooling reduces the probability of developing subsequenthypertension by approximately 7-10 percentage points. No significanteffect was found for the introduction of the second law change in1973. (c) 2010 by The University of Chicago. Allrights reserved.

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  • Nattavudh Powdthavee, 2010. "Does Education Reduce the Risk of Hypertension? Estimating the Biomarker Effect of Compulsory Schooling in England," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(2), pages 173-202.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jhucap:v:4:y:2010:i:2:p:173-202
    DOI: 10.1086/657020
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H1 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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