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Does Education Reduce the Risk of Hypertension? Estimating the Biomarker Effect of Compulsory Schooling in England

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  • Nattavudh Powdthavee

Abstract

This paper estimates the exogenous effect of schooling on reducedincidence of hypertension. Using the changes in the minimum school-leavingage law in the United Kingdom from age 14 to 15 in 1947 and from age15 to 16 in 1973 as sources of exogenous variation in schooling, theregression discontinuity and instrumental variable probit estimatesimply that, for the first law change in 1947, completing an extrayear of schooling reduces the probability of developing subsequenthypertension by approximately 7-10 percentage points. No significanteffect was found for the introduction of the second law change in1973. (c) 2010 by The University of Chicago. Allrights reserved.

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  • Nattavudh Powdthavee, 2010. "Does Education Reduce the Risk of Hypertension? Estimating the Biomarker Effect of Compulsory Schooling in England," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(2), pages 173-202.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jhucap:v:4:y:2010:i:2:p:173-202
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    1. Newey, Whitney K., 1987. "Efficient estimation of limited dependent variable models with endogenous explanatory variables," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 231-250, November.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Janke, Katharina & Johnston, David W. & Propper, Carol & Shields, Michael A., 2018. "The Causal Effect of Education on Chronic Health Conditions," IZA Discussion Papers 11353, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Johnston, David W. & Lordan, Grace & Shields, Michael A. & Suziedelyte, Agne, 2015. "Education and health knowledge: Evidence from UK compulsory schooling reform," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 127(C), pages 92-100.
    3. Powdthavee, Nattavudh & Lekfuangfu, Warn N. & Wooden, Mark, 2015. "What's the good of education on our overall quality of life? A simultaneous equation model of education and life satisfaction for Australia," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 10-21.
    4. Michael Grossman, 2015. "The Relationship between Health and Schooling: What’s New?," NBER Working Papers 21609, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Powdthavee, Nattavudh & Adireksombat, Kampon, 2010. "From Classroom to Wedding Aisle: The Effect of a Nationwide Change in the Compulsory Schooling Law on Age at First Marriage in the UK," IZA Discussion Papers 5019, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. John Gibson & Steven Stillman & David McKenzie & Halahingano Rohorua, 2013. "Natural Experiment Evidence On The Effect Of Migration On Blood Pressure And Hypertension," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(6), pages 655-672, June.
    7. Davillas, A.; Jones, A.M.; Benzeval, M.;, 2017. "The income-health gradient: Evidence from self-reported health and biomarkers using longitudinal data on income," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 17/04, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    8. Kemptner, Daniel & Jürges, Hendrik & Reinhold, Steffen, 2011. "Changes in compulsory schooling and the causal effect of education on health: Evidence from Germany," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 340-354, March.
    9. Giorgio Brunello & Margherita Fort & Nicole Schneeweis & Rudolf Winter‐Ebmer, 2016. "The Causal Effect of Education on Health: What is the Role of Health Behaviors?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(3), pages 314-336, March.
    10. Petter Lundborg, 2013. "The health returns to schooling—what can we learn from twins?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 673-701, April.
    11. Hart, Robert A & Moro, Mirko & Roberts, J Elizabeth, 2015. "Who gained from the introduction of free universal secondary education in England and Wales?," Stirling Economics Discussion Papers 2015-02, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
    12. Qing Li & Alain A. Cohen & Linda P. Fried, 2017. "A novel health metric based on biomarkers," Cahiers de recherche 17-08, Departement d'Economique de l'École de gestion à l'Université de Sherbrooke.
    13. Cabus, Sofie J. & De Witte, Kristof, 2011. "Does school time matter?—On the impact of compulsory education age on school dropout," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1384-1398.
    14. Hart, Robert A & Moro, Mirko & Roberts, J Elizabeth, 2012. "Date of birth, family background, and the 11 plus exam: short- and long-term consequences of the 1944 secondary education reforms in England and W ales," Stirling Economics Discussion Papers 2012-10, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
    15. repec:taf:jdevst:v:53:y:2017:i:9:p:1358-1375 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. repec:iae:iaewps:wp2014n01 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Brunello, Giorgio & Fort, Margherita & Schneeweis, Nicole & Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 2011. "The Causal Effect of Education on Health," Economics Series 280, Institute for Advanced Studies.
    18. repec:eee:socmed:v:188:y:2017:i:c:p:128-136 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Eide, Eric R. & Showalter, Mark H., 2011. "Estimating the relation between health and education: What do we know and what do we need to know?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 778-791, October.
    20. Rasyad A. Parinduri, 2017. "Does Education Improve Health? Evidence from Indonesia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 53(9), pages 1358-1375, September.
    21. Raquel Fonseca & Yuhui Zheng, 2013. "The Effect of Education on Health: Cross-Country Evidence," Cahiers de recherche 1325, CIRPEE.
    22. Hendrik Jürges & Eberhard Kruk & Steffen Reinhold, 2013. "The effect of compulsory schooling on health—evidence from biomarkers," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(2), pages 645-672, April.
    23. David (David Patrick) Madden, 2015. "Do Schooling Reforms Also Improve Long-Run Health?," Working Papers 201531, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    24. Naomi Duke & Ross Macmillan, 2016. "Schooling, skills, and self-rated health: A test of conventional wisdom on the relationship between educational attainment and health," Working Papers 087, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H1 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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