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Does supply matter? Initial schooling conditions and the effectiveness of conditional cash transfers for grade progression in Nicaragua

Author

Listed:
  • John Maluccio
  • Alexis Murphy
  • Ferdinando Regalia

Abstract

The authors use a randomised evaluation to examine the effect of a conditional cash transfer programme on grade progression in Nicaragua from 1999 to 2003, putting the spotlight on initial supply-side conditions and the extent to which they conditioned programme effectiveness. Their principal findings are that the programme had a substantial effect on grade progression and it was more effective in areas with autonomous schools. At the same time, it was also more effective in intervention areas with poor initial supply conditions as measured by indicators of grade availability and distance to school. These areas had lower outcomes before the programme, and thus more room for improvement. The results suggest that initial school supply conditions are not insurmountable obstacles for the successful implementation of a conditional cash transfer (CCT) programme, as long as these constraints are identified at the planning stage and mechanisms put in place to address them during execution.

Suggested Citation

  • John Maluccio & Alexis Murphy & Ferdinando Regalia, 2010. "Does supply matter? Initial schooling conditions and the effectiveness of conditional cash transfers for grade progression in Nicaragua," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(1), pages 87-116.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevef:v:2:y:2010:i:1:p:87-116
    DOI: 10.1080/19439340903584085
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ariel Fiszbein & Norbert Schady & Francisco H.G. Ferreira & Margaret Grosh & Niall Keleher & Pedro Olinto & Emmanuel Skoufias, 2009. "Conditional Cash Transfers : Reducing Present and Future Poverty," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2597, August.
    2. World Bank, 2001. "Nicaragua Poverty Assessment : Challenges and Opportunities for Poverty Reduction, Volume 2. Annexes," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15532, The World Bank.
    3. Ferdinando Regalía & Leslie Castro, 2007. "Performance-based Incentives for Health: Demand- and Supply-Side Incentives in the Nicaraguan Red de Protección Social," Working Papers 119, Center for Global Development.
    4. World Bank, 2001. "Nicaragua Poverty Assessment : Challenges and Opportunities for Poverty Reduction, Volume 1. Main Report," World Bank Other Operational Studies 15531, The World Bank.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Galiani, Sebastian & McEwan, Patrick J., 2013. "The heterogeneous impact of conditional cash transfers," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 85-96.
    2. Scarlato, Margherita, 2012. "Social Enterprise, Capabilities and Development: Lessons from Ecuador," MPRA Paper 37618, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Tania Barham & Karen Macours & John A. Maluccio, 2013. "More Schooling and More Learning?: Effects of a Three-Year Conditional Cash Transfer Program in Nicaragua after 10 Years," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 4584, Inter-American Development Bank.
    4. repec:eee:wdevel:v:99:y:2017:i:c:p:498-517 is not listed on IDEAS

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