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Intergenerational mobility and occupational status in Britain

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  • Fiona Carmichael

Abstract

This paper examines the link between parents occupational attainment and that of their children. The existence of such a link implies dependence on inherited conditions and the stronger the link the less the potential for intergenerational mobility. The degree to which occupational mobility is influenced by parental achievements is investigated using data from the British Household Panel Survey. The evidence obtained suggests that individual attainment is strongly influenced by parental status. In particular, the occupational attainment of sons is found to depend significantly on the socioeconomic status of their fathers. The implication is that occupational mobility in 1990s Britain was still to some extent constrained by the achievements of the previous generation.

Suggested Citation

  • Fiona Carmichael, 2000. "Intergenerational mobility and occupational status in Britain," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(6), pages 391-396.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:7:y:2000:i:6:p:391-396
    DOI: 10.1080/135048500351339
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    Cited by:

    1. Caner, Asena & Okten, Cagla, 2010. "Risk and career choice: Evidence from Turkey," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1060-1075, December.
    2. Giorgio Di Pietro & Peter Urwin, 2003. "Intergenerational mobility and occupational status in Italy," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(12), pages 793-797.
    3. David Cantarero & Marta Pascual, 2005. "Regional Differences In Health In Spain - An Empirical Analysis," ERSA conference papers ersa05p551, European Regional Science Association.
    4. Pascual, Marta, 2009. "Intergenerational income mobility: The transmission of socio-economic status in Spain," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 31(6), pages 835-846, November.
    5. Gabriella Berloffa & Eleonora Matteazzi & Paola Villa, 2016. "Family background and youth labour market outcomes across Europe," Working Papers 393, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    6. Nguyen, Anh & Getinet, Haile, 2003. "Intergenerational mobility in educational and occupational status: evidence from the U.S," MPRA Paper 1383, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Haile, Getinet Astatike, 2016. "Intergenerational Mobility in Income and Economic Status in Ethiopia," IZA Discussion Papers 10047, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Nicoletti, Cheti, 2008. "Multiple sample selection in the estimation of intergenerational occupational mobility," ISER Working Paper Series 2008-20, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    9. Vincenzo Scoppa, 2009. "Intergenerational transfers of public sector jobs: a shred of evidence on nepotism," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 141(1), pages 167-188, October.

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