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Inégalités des chances sur le marché du travail : effets de l'origine sociale sur la mobilité professionnelle à Lima

Author

Listed:
  • Laure Pasquier-Doumer
  • Gerardo David Rosas Shady

Abstract

Peruvian society is characterized by a highly unequal income distribution. But is it also an unfair society in terms of the equal-opportunity criterion? Several studies have shown that social origin does not necessarily have a decreasing effect during the life cycle. For example, social origin can continue to influence a working career even after influencing education and the first job. The authors seek to answer this question by analyzing the effect of social origin on occupational mobility in Peru. They attempt to measure the impact of social background on occupational mobility after controlling for its effect on the prior stages of the life cycle.

Suggested Citation

  • Laure Pasquier-Doumer & Gerardo David Rosas Shady, 2008. "Inégalités des chances sur le marché du travail : effets de l'origine sociale sur la mobilité professionnelle à Lima," Economie & Prévision, La Documentation Française, vol. 0(5), pages 67-87.
  • Handle: RePEc:cai:ecoldc:ecop_186_0067
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lam, David & Schoeni, Robert F, 1993. "Effects of Family Background on Earnings and Returns to Schooling: Evidence from Brazil," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(4), pages 710-740, August.
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    4. Gary S. Becker & Nigel Tomes, 1994. "Human Capital and the Rise and Fall of Families," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education, Third Edition, pages 257-298 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. George A. Akerlof, 1997. "Social Distance and Social Decisions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(5), pages 1005-1028, September.
    6. Zimmerman, David J, 1992. "Regression toward Mediocrity in Economic Stature," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(3), pages 409-429, June.
    7. Piketty, Thomas, 1998. "Self-fulfilling beliefs about social status," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 115-132, October.
    8. Robert Haveman & Barbara Wolfe, 1995. "The Determinants of Children's Attainments: A Review of Methods and Findings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 33(4), pages 1829-1878, December.
    9. Jacoby, Hanan G, 1994. "Borrowing Constraints and Progress through School: Evidence from Peru," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 76(1), pages 151-160, February.
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