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Does gender-specific starting point bias in choice experiments prevail among well-informed respondents: evidence from an empirical study

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  • Jacob Ladenburg

Abstract

Welfare estimates in discrete choice experiments studies are found to be sensitive towards the applied bid vector, i.e. anchoring bias or starting point bias. Furthermore, there are some evidence that female respondents might be more prone to starting point bias compared to male respondents. Using a market good, starting point bias is tested and found on the preference margin only to be evident among female respondents with less experience with the market good. Experienced female and male respondents do not state significant starting point biased preferences. This suggests that starting point bias might be less severe among well-informed respondents.

Suggested Citation

  • Jacob Ladenburg, 2013. "Does gender-specific starting point bias in choice experiments prevail among well-informed respondents: evidence from an empirical study," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(17), pages 1527-1530, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:20:y:2013:i:17:p:1527-1530
    DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2013.829173
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ladenburg, Jacob & Olsen, Søren Bøye, 2008. "Gender-specific starting point bias in choice experiments: Evidence from an empirical study," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 275-285, November.
    2. Train,Kenneth E., 2009. "Discrete Choice Methods with Simulation," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521766555, December.
    3. Ryan, Mandy & Wordsworth, Sarah, 2000. "Sensitivity of Willingness to Pay Estimates to the Level of Attributes in Discrete Choice Experiments," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 47(5), pages 504-524, November.
    4. John A. List, 2003. "Does Market Experience Eliminate Market Anomalies?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 118(1), pages 41-71.
    5. John A. List, 2004. "Neoclassical Theory Versus Prospect Theory: Evidence from the Marketplace," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(2), pages 615-625, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ladenburg, Jacob & Olsen, Søren Bøye, 2014. "Augmenting short Cheap Talk scripts with a repeated Opt-Out Reminder in Choice Experiment surveys," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 39-63.
    2. Tenaw G. Abate & Morten R. Mørkbak & Søren B. Olsen, 2018. "Inducing value and institutional learning effects in stated choice experiments using advanced disclosure and instructional choice set treatments," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 49(3), pages 339-351, May.
    3. Oerlemans, Leon A.G. & Chan, Kai-Ying & Volschenk, Jako, 2016. "Willingness to pay for green electricity: A review of the contingent valuation literature and its sources of error," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 875-885.
    4. Frédéric Salladarré & Dorothée Brécard & Sterenn Lucas & Pierrick Ollivier, 2016. "Are French consumers ready to pay a premium for eco-labeled seafood products? A contingent valuation estimation with heterogeneous anchoring," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 47(2), pages 247-258, March.

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