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The decreasing returns on working time: an empirical analysis on panel country data

  • Gilbert Cette
  • Samuel Chang
  • Maty Konte

An empirical analysis is conducted on two panels of 18 Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries to test whether the elasticity of hourly productivity to working time is negative and decreasing with working time itself. If so, the decreasing returns on working time could be indicative of a fatigue effect that increases with working time. We find that the elasticity of productivity per hour to working time is negative and decreases with working time, but its coefficient is not strongly significant. This study offers empirical support for the hypothesis of a fatigue effect that increases with working time, but with some reservations.

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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 18 (2011)
Issue (Month): 17 ()
Pages: 1677-1682

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Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:18:y:2011:i:17:p:1677-1682
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  1. Mark E Schaffer & Steven Stillman, 2006. "XTOVERID: Stata module to calculate tests of overidentifying restrictions after xtreg, xtivreg, xtivreg2, xthtaylor," Statistical Software Components S456779, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 22 Feb 2015.
  2. Bourles, Renaud & Cette, Gilbert, 2007. "Trends in "structural" productivity levels in the major industrialized countries," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 95(1), pages 151-156, April.
  3. Renaud Bourlès & Gilbert Cette, 2005. "A comparison of structural productivity levels in the major industrialised countries," OECD Economic Studies, OECD Publishing, vol. 2005(2), pages 75-108.
  4. Ian Dew-Becker & Robert J. Gordon, 2008. "The Role of Labor Market Changes in the Slowdown of European Productivity Growth," NBER Working Papers 13840, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Christopher F Baum & Steven Stillman, 1999. "DMEXOGXT: Stata module to test consistency of OLS vs XT-IV estimates," Statistical Software Components S401103, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 18 Jun 2003.
  6. Belorgey, N. & Lecat, R. & Maury, T-P., 2004. "Déterminants de la productivité par employé : une évaluation empirique en données de panel," Bulletin de la Banque de France, Banque de France, issue 121, pages 87-113.
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