IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/soinre/v129y2016i2d10.1007_s11205-015-1114-3.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

An Index of Community-Level Socioeconomic Composition for Global Health Research

Author

Listed:
  • Shivani A. Patel

    () (Emory University)

  • Susan G. Sherman

    (Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health)

  • Subarna K. Khatry

    (Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
    The Nepal Nutrition Intervention Project-Sarlahi)

  • Steven C. LeClerq

    (Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health)

  • Joanne Katz

    (Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health)

  • James M. Tielsch

    (George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services)

  • Parul Christian

    (Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health)

Abstract

Abstract Despite increasing recognition that community-level socioeconomic factors are critical to individual health outcomes globally, guidance on their measurement remains limited in low and middle income countries. We outline the steps needed to develop and validate a theory-based, multidimensional index of community-level socioeconomic composition using information that is often available in global settings. Census indicators describing human and social capital were analyzed using principal components analysis to construct a community socioeconomic composition index (CSCI) for 30 communities in the Southern plains of Nepal. The index was validated against subsequent child nutrition, household assets, and village infrastructure using data from 1822 children and their households. At the community-level, the CSCI was positively correlated with child height-for-age, and child weight-for-age, household assets, and community infrastructure (r = 0.54, 0.58, 0.85, 0.67, respectively). In multilevel analyses, +1SD of the CSCI was associated with +0.14SD of the household asset index (p

Suggested Citation

  • Shivani A. Patel & Susan G. Sherman & Subarna K. Khatry & Steven C. LeClerq & Joanne Katz & James M. Tielsch & Parul Christian, 2016. "An Index of Community-Level Socioeconomic Composition for Global Health Research," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 129(2), pages 639-658, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:129:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s11205-015-1114-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-015-1114-3
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11205-015-1114-3
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Avan, Bilal Iqbal & Kirkwood, Betty, 2010. "Role of neighbourhoods in child growth and development: Does 'place' matter?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 102-109, July.
    2. Stephen Knack & Philip Keefer, 1997. "Does Social Capital Have an Economic Payoff? A Cross-Country Investigation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1251-1288.
    3. Oakes, J. Michael & Rossi, Peter H., 2003. "The measurement of SES in health research: current practice and steps toward a new approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 56(4), pages 769-784, February.
    4. Grosh, M.E. & Glewwe, P., 1995. "A Guide to Living Standards Measurement Study Surveys and their Data Sets," Papers 120, World Bank - Living Standards Measurement.
    5. Deon Filmer & Lant Pritchett, 2001. "Estimating Wealth Effects Without Expenditure Data—Or Tears: An Application To Educational Enrollments In States Of India," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 38(1), pages 115-132, February.
    6. Benhabib, Jess & Spiegel, Mark M., 1994. "The role of human capital in economic development evidence from aggregate cross-country data," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 143-173, October.
    7. Nan Marie Astone & Constance A. Nathanson & Robert Schoen & Young J. Kim, 1999. "Family Demography, Social Theory, and Investment in Social Capital," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 25(1), pages 1-31.
    8. repec:aph:ajpbhl:2003:93:11:1820-1829_1 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Øystein Kravdal, 2002. "Education and fertility in sub-Saharan africa: Individual and community effects," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 39(2), pages 233-250, May.
    10. Parashar, Sangeeta, 2005. "Moving beyond the mother-child dyad: Women's education, child immunization, and the importance of context in rural India," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 61(5), pages 989-1000, September.
    11. Glass, Thomas A. & McAtee, Matthew J., 2006. "Behavioral science at the crossroads in public health: Extending horizons, envisioning the future," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 62(7), pages 1650-1671, April.
    12. Deborah Degraff & Richard Bilsborrow & David Guilkey, 1997. "Community-level determinants of contraceptive use in the Philippines: A structural analysis," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 34(3), pages 385-398, August.
    13. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2004.050872_2 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Cortinovis, I. & Vella, V. & Ndiku, J., 1993. "Construction of a socio-economic index to facilitate analysis of health data in developing countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 36(8), pages 1087-1097, April.
    15. Nancy Luke & Hongwei Xu, 2011. "Exploring the meaning of context for health: Community influences on child health in South India," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 24(15), pages 345-374, February.
    16. David McKenzie, 2005. "Measuring inequality with asset indicators," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(2), pages 229-260, June.
    17. Alderman, Harold & King, Elizabeth M., 1998. "Gender differences in parental investment in education," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 453-468, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:129:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s11205-015-1114-3. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.