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Subjective Well-Being and Armed Conflict: Evidence from Bosnia-Herzegovina

  • Olga Shemyakina

    ()

  • Anke Plagnol

    ()

We analyze survey data from Bosnia and Herzegovina collected after the 1992–1995 Bosnian War to answer the following questions: How does individual subjective well-being evolve in the post-conflict period? Does exposure to conflict have an important role in determining one’s post-war experiences? Our identification strategy relies on regional and individual-level variation in exposure to the conflict. Individual war-related trauma has a negative, significant, and lasting impact on subjective well-being. The effect is stronger for those displaced during the war. Municipality-level conflict measures are not significantly associated with subjective well-being once municipality fixed effects are accounted for. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2013

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11205-012-0131-8
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Social Indicators Research.

Volume (Year): 113 (2013)
Issue (Month): 3 (September)
Pages: 1129-1152

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Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:113:y:2013:i:3:p:1129-1152
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/11135

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