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Impacts of energy-related CO2 emissions in China: a spatial panel data technique

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  • Yan-Qing Kang

    () (Tianjin University)

  • Tao Zhao

    (Tianjin University)

  • Peng Wu

    (Beijing Normal University)

Abstract

Abstract Since carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions cause great concern around the world, a large amount of literature focuses on the impact factors of CO2 emissions. However, there is little specific guidance on the spatial effects of variables and regional characteristics of CO2 emissions in China. Based on spatial panel methods, this paper used a STIRPAT (stochastic impacts by regression on population, affluence and technology) model to examine the impact of energy-related factors on CO2 emissions in China. Then, the spillover effects of China’s provincial per capita CO2 emissions have been tested. The results indicate that there exist obvious spatial correlation and spatial agglomeration features in spatial distribution of per capita CO2 emissions. Spatial economic model is demonstrated to offer a greater explanatory power than the traditional non-spatial panel model. Moreover, GDP per capita, energy intensity, industrial structure and urbanization have positive and significant effects on CO2 emissions, while the coefficient of population is not significant. According to these results, this paper proposes some policy suggestions on reducing China’s CO2 emissions.

Suggested Citation

  • Yan-Qing Kang & Tao Zhao & Peng Wu, 2016. "Impacts of energy-related CO2 emissions in China: a spatial panel data technique," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 81(1), pages 405-421, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:nathaz:v:81:y:2016:i:1:d:10.1007_s11069-015-2087-x
    DOI: 10.1007/s11069-015-2087-x
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    1. repec:eee:rensus:v:81:y:2018:i:p2:p:2935-2946 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:rrs:journl:v:11:y:2017:i:1:p:18-35 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:spr:nathaz:v:88:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11069-017-2932-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:2:p:333-:d:129090 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Wang, Miao & Feng, Chao, 2017. "Decomposition of energy-related CO2 emissions in China: An empirical analysis based on provincial panel data of three sectors," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 190(C), pages 772-787.
    6. Yalan Zhao & Yaoqiu Kuang & Ningsheng Huang, 2016. "Decomposition Analysis in Decoupling Transport Output from Carbon Emissions in Guangdong Province, China," Energies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(4), pages 1-23, April.
    7. repec:gam:jeners:v:9:y:2016:i:4:p:295:d:68469 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Sinha, Avik & Shahbaz, Muhammad & Balsalobre, Daniel, 2017. "Exploring the Relationship between Energy Usage Segregation and Environmental Degradation in N-11 Countries," MPRA Paper 81212, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 07 Sep 2017.

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