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Weathering the storm: weather shocks and international labor migration from the Philippines

Author

Listed:
  • Marjorie C. Pajaron

    (University of the Philippines, Diliman)

  • Glacer Niño A. Vasquez

    (University of the Philippines, Diliman)

Abstract

The environmental migration literature presents conflicting results: While some research finds that natural disasters induce international migration, other work discovers a dampening effect. We construct an innovative longitudinal provincial dataset for the Philippines, a country prone to natural disasters and a major exporter of labor. Using a comprehensive list of weather shocks, it is possible to identify major channels behind those conflicting findings. Filipinos are more likely to work abroad when they experience less-intense tropical cyclones and storm warnings but are more likely to stay when very intense storms occur or are forecasted.

Suggested Citation

  • Marjorie C. Pajaron & Glacer Niño A. Vasquez, 2020. "Weathering the storm: weather shocks and international labor migration from the Philippines," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 33(4), pages 1419-1461, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:33:y:2020:i:4:d:10.1007_s00148-020-00779-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-020-00779-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Isabelle Chort & Maëlys de la Rupelle, 2022. "Managing the impact of climate on migration: evidence from Mexico," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 35(4), pages 1777-1819, October.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; Natural disaster; Panel dataset; Agriculture; OFWs;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C36 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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