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Planned fertility and family background: a quantile regression for counts analysis

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  • Alfonso Miranda

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Abstract

This paper examines how fertility plans of young individuals who live in intact families (i.e., those where both biological parents are present) differ from the fertility plans of young individuals who live in non-intact families in Mexico. The paper also analyses whether family background has a relevant role in the formation of fertility plans. An innovative technique for estimating quantile regression for count data is used for the analysis.
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Suggested Citation

  • Alfonso Miranda, 2008. "Planned fertility and family background: a quantile regression for counts analysis," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(1), pages 67-81, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:21:y:2008:i:1:p:67-81 DOI: 10.1007/s00148-007-0154-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Becker, Gary S & Lewis, H Gregg, 1973. "On the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages 279-288, Part II, .
    2. Maria Melkersson & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2000. "Modeling female fertility using inflated count data models," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 189-203.
    3. Wei-Jun J. Yeung & Greg J. Duncan & Martha S. Hill, 2001. "Childhood family structure and young adult behaviors," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 271-299.
    4. Susan Gustavus & Charles Nam, 1970. "The formation and stability of ideal family size among young people," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 7(1), pages 43-51, February.
    5. Hans-Peter Kohler, 1997. "Learning in social networks and contraceptive choice," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 34(3), pages 369-383, August.
    6. Francisco Covas & J.M.C. Santos Silva, 2000. "A modified hurdle model for completed fertility," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 173-188.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Popp, David & Santen, Nidhi & Fisher-Vanden, Karen & Webster, Mort, 2013. "Technology variation vs. R&D uncertainty: What matters most for energy patent success?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 505-533.
    2. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00348829 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Alison L. Booth & Hiau Joo Kee, 2009. "Intergenerational Transmission of Fertility Patterns," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 71(2), pages 183-208, April.
    4. Lohr, Luanne & Park, Timothy, 2012. "Demand for Private Marketing Expertise by Organic Farmers: A Quantile Analysis Based on Counts," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, pages 157-171.
    5. Moreira S & Pita Barros P, 2009. "Double coverage and demand for health care: Evidence from quantile regression," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 09/21, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    6. Thomas Baudin, 2015. "Religion and fertility: The French connection," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 32(13), pages 397-420, February.
    7. repec:eee:reveco:v:51:y:2017:i:c:p:645-659 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. repec:fgv:epgrbe:v:66:n:4:a:3 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Richard J. Volpe & Timothy A. Park & Fengxia Dong & Helen H. Jensen, 2016. "Somatic cell counts in dairy marketing: quantile regression for count data," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 43(2), pages 331-358.
    10. Eschelbach Martina, 2015. "Family Culture and Fertility Outcomes – Evidence from American Siblings," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(3), pages 246-267, June.
    11. David Popp & Nidhi Santen & Karen Fisher-Vanden & Mort Webster, 2012. "Technology Variation vs. R&D Uncertainty: What Matters Most for Energy Patent Success?," NBER Working Papers 17792, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Thomas Baudin, 2012. "More on Religion and Fertility: The French Connection," Working Papers hal-00993310, HAL.
    13. Maricruz Lacalle-Calderon & Manuel Perez-Trujillo & Isabel Neira, 2017. "Fertility and Economic Development: Quantile Regression Evidence on the Inverse J-shaped Pattern," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 33(1), pages 1-31, February.
    14. Georgios Papadopoulos, 2013. "Immigration Status and Victimization: Evidence from the British Crime Survey," University of East Anglia Applied and Financial Economics Working Paper Series 042, School of Economics, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK..

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Fertility; Count data; Quantile regression; J13; J15; C25;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies

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