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Childhood family structure and young adult behaviors

Author

Listed:
  • Wei-Jun J. Yeung

    () (Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, P.O. Box 1248 Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1248, USA)

  • Greg J. Duncan

    () (Institute for Policy Research, Northwestern University, 2040 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, IL 60202, USA)

  • Martha S. Hill

    () (Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, P.O. Box 1248 Ann Arbor, MI 48106-1248, USA)

Abstract

This paper examines a wide variety of forms, and full histories, of family structure to test existing theories of family influences and identify needs for new theories. The focus is on links between childhood family structure and both completed schooling and risk of a nonmarital birth. Using a 27-year span of panel (PSID) data for U.S. children, we find that: (a) change is stressful, (b) timing during childhood is relevant, (c) adults other than parents are important, and (d) two more recently studied family structures (mother-with-grandparent(s) and mother-with-stepfather) do not fit the molds of existing theories. The findings suggest that new theories should consider allocation of resources and reasons people group into family structures.

Suggested Citation

  • Wei-Jun J. Yeung & Greg J. Duncan & Martha S. Hill, 2001. "Childhood family structure and young adult behaviors," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(2), pages 271-299.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:14:y:2001:i:2:p:271-299 Note: Received: 11 September 1998/Accepted: 27 March 2000
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Flinn, Christopher J, 2000. "Modes of Interaction between Divorced Parents," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 41(3), pages 545-578, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. David Blau & Wilbert Klaauw, 2008. "A demographic analysis of the family structure experiences of children in the United States," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 193-221, September.
    2. repec:zbw:espost:168322 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Julia Alamillo, "undated". "Family Structure and Reproduction of Inequality: A Decomposition Approach," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 848d4b9e0bd14c8191ed1277b, Mathematica Policy Research.
    4. Marco Francesconi & Stephen Jenkins & Thomas Siedler, 2010. "Childhood family structure and schooling outcomes: evidence for Germany," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 1073-1103.
    5. Marco Francesconi & Stephen P. Jenkins & Thomas Siedler, 2010. "The effect of lone motherhood on the smoking behavior of young adults," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(11), pages 1377-1384.
    6. Heather Antecol & Kelly Bedard, 2007. "Does single parenthood increase the probability of teenage promiscuity, substance use, and crime?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 55-71.
    7. Alexander N. Slade & Andrea H. Beller & Elizabeth T. Powers, 2017. "Family structure and young adult health outcomes," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 15(1), pages 175-197, March.
    8. Alfonso Miranda, 2008. "Planned fertility and family background: a quantile regression for counts analysis," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 67-81.
    9. Heather Antecol & Kelly Bedard, 2002. "Does Single Parenthood Increase the Probability of Teenage Promiscuity, Drug Use and Crime?," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2002-23, Claremont Colleges.
    10. Khlat, Myriam & Jusot, Florence & Ville, Isabelle, 2009. "Social origins, early hardship and obesity: A strong association in women, but not in men?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, pages 1692-1699.
    11. Björklund Anders & Lindahl Lena & Lindquist Matthew J., 2010. "What More Than Parental Income, Education and Occupation? An Exploration of What Swedish Siblings Get from Their Parents," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, pages 1-40.
    12. Ronald Bulanda & Wendy Manning, 2008. "Parental Cohabitation Experiences and Adolescent Behavioral Outcomes," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 27(5), pages 593-618, October.
    13. Peter Kooreman, 2007. "Time, money, peers, and parents; some data and theories on teenage behavior," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, pages 9-33.
    14. Christina Gibson-Davis, 2014. "Magic Moment? Maternal Marriage for Children Born Out of Wedlock," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 51(4), pages 1345-1356, August.
    15. Naoko Akashi-Ronquest, 2009. "The impact of biological preferences on parental investments in children and step-children," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 7(1), pages 59-81, March.
    16. repec:pal:easeco:v:43:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1057_eej.2015.48 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Susan Brown, 2006. "Family structure transitions and adolescent well-being," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 43(3), pages 447-461, August.
    18. Helen Duh & Sarah Benmoyal-Bouzaglo & George Moschis & Lilia Smaoui, 2015. "Examination of Young Adults’ Materialism in France and South Africa Using Two Life-Course Theoretical Perspectives," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 251-262, June.
    19. Mohanty, Madhu S. & Ullah, Aman, 2012. "Direct and indirect effects of happiness on wage: A simultaneous equations approach," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 143-152.
    20. Whitaker, Stephan, 2011. "The impact of legalized abortion on high school graduation through selection and composition," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 228-246, April.
    21. Lisa A. Gennetian, 2004. "How Sibling Composition Affects Adolescent Schooling Outcomes When Welfare Reform Policies Increase Maternal Employment," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 30(1), pages 81-100, Winter.
    22. Mark Ottoni-Wilhelm & Robert Bandy, 2013. "Stage-specific family structure models: implicit parameter restrictions and Bayesian model comparison with an application to prosocial behavior," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 313-340, September.
    23. Karen Conway & Minghua Li, 2012. "Family structure and child outcomes: a high definition, wide angle “snapshot”," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 345-374, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demographic economics · marital dissolution · family structure;

    JEL classification:

    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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