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Minimum investment requirement, financial market imperfection and self-fulfilling belief

Author

Listed:
  • Tomoo Kikuchi

    () (National University of Singapore)

  • George Vachadze

    () (City University of New York)

Abstract

We develop a model in which a strategic complementarity in saving decisions arises due to a minimum investment requirement and financial market imperfection. We explore the role of self-fulling beliefs in determining the long run dynamics. The model exhibits a wide range of dynamic phenomena such as a poverty trap, a big push and a sunspot equilibrium, depending on the level of financial market imperfection. They account for excessive volatility and a sudden change in the saving rate and its macroeconomic consequences without any shocks to fundamentals.

Suggested Citation

  • Tomoo Kikuchi & George Vachadze, 2018. "Minimum investment requirement, financial market imperfection and self-fulfilling belief," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 28(2), pages 305-332, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:28:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s00191-017-0510-z
    DOI: 10.1007/s00191-017-0510-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial market imperfection; Strategic complementarity; Saving rate; Self-fulfilling belief; Sunspot; multiple equilibria;

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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