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Unemployment Duration and Disability: Evidence from Portugal

Author

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  • Dario Sciulli

    ()

  • Antonio Menezes

    ()

  • José Vieira

    ()

Abstract

In this paper we use Portuguese data on individual (multiple) unemployment spells and apply semi-parametric duration models to investigate the effects of different types of disabilities on (re)employment probabilities. We find that disabled persons with muscular, skeletal, geriatric and sensorial problems experience the longest unemployment spells. Organic (blind, deaf or linguistic) disabilities also significantly reduce the probability of finding a job, while intellectual or psychological disabilities do not. We also find that having previous employment experience and vocational training raise the probability of leaving unemployment into employment. Negative duration dependence and unobserved heterogeneity are also found in the data. Policies that seek to promote job accessibility should take into account the heterogeneous nature of the effects of different disabilities on reemployment.
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Suggested Citation

  • Dario Sciulli & Antonio Menezes & José Vieira, 2012. "Unemployment Duration and Disability: Evidence from Portugal," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 21-48, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jlabre:v:33:y:2012:i:1:p:21-48
    DOI: 10.1007/s12122-011-9120-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Chiara Mussida & Dario Sciulli, 2015. "Direct and indirect effects of disability on employment probabilities: a comparative analysis," DISCE - Quaderni del Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali dises1507, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
    2. Michael Kind, 2015. "A Level Playing Field: An Optimal Weighting Scheme of Dismissal Protection Characteristics," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(1), pages 79-99, March.
    3. Michael Kind, 2013. "A Level Playing Field – An Optimal Weighting Scheme of Dismissal Protection Characteristics," Ruhr Economic Papers 0442, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    4. Chiara Mussida & Dario Sciulli, 2016. "Disability and employment across Central and Eastern European Countries," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-24, December.
    5. repec:zbw:rwirep:0442 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Massimiliano Agovino & Agnese Rapposelli, 2017. "Macroeconomic impact of flexicurity on the integration of people with disabilities into the labour market. A two-regime spatial autoregressive analysis," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 51(1), pages 307-334, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Disability; Unemployment duration; Discrete time hazard models;

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies

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