IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

How individualism–collectivism orientations predict happiness in a collectivistic context


  • Arménio Rego


  • Miguel Cunha



No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Arménio Rego & Miguel Cunha, 2009. "How individualism–collectivism orientations predict happiness in a collectivistic context," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 19-35, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jhappi:v:10:y:2009:i:1:p:19-35 DOI: 10.1007/s10902-007-9059-0

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gary S. Becker & Tomas J. Philipson & Rodrigo R. Soares, 2005. "The Quantity and Quality of Life and the Evolution of World Inequality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 277-291, March.
    2. Max Haller & Markus Hadler, 2006. "How Social Relations and Structures can Produce Happiness and Unhappiness: An International Comparative Analysis," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 75(2), pages 169-216, January.
    3. Robert Westwood & Andrew Chan & Stephen Linstead, 2004. "Theorizing Chinese Employment Relations Comparatively: Exchange, Reciprocity and the Moral Economy," Asia Pacific Journal of Management, Springer, vol. 21(3), pages 365-389, September.
    4. Jesuino, Jorge Correia, 2002. "Latin europe cluster: from South to North," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 81-89, April.
    5. Claire Murphy & Nagarajan Ramamoorthy & Patrick C. Flood & Sarah MacCurtain, 2006. "Organizational Justice Perceptions and Employee Attitudes among Irish Blue Collar Employees: An Empirical Test of the Main and Moderating Roles of Individualism/Collectivism," management revue. Socio-economic Studies, Rainer Hampp Verlag, vol. 17(3), pages 328-343.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Yanping Li & Jia Xu & Yidong Tu & Xinxin Lu, 2014. "Ethical Leadership and Subordinates’ Occupational Well-Being: A Multi-level Examination in China," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 116(3), pages 823-842, May.
    2. Arménio Rego & Miguel Pina e Cunha, 2012. "They Need to be Different, They Feel Happier in Authentizotic Climates," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 701-727, August.
    3. Kit-Chun Lam & Pak-Wai Liu, 2014. "Socio-Economic Inequalities in Happiness in China and U.S," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 116(2), pages 509-533, April.
    4. Małgorzata Mikucka, 2014. "Does Individualistic Culture Lower the Well-Being of the Unemployed? Evidence from Europe," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 15(3), pages 673-691, June.
    5. Rego, Arménio & Ribeiro, Neuza & Cunha, Miguel Pina e & Jesuino, Jorge Correia, 2011. "How happiness mediates the organizational virtuousness and affective commitment relationship," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 64(5), pages 524-532, May.
    6. Arménio Rego & Neuza Ribeiro & Miguel Cunha, 2010. "Perceptions of Organizational Virtuousness and Happiness as Predictors of Organizational Citizenship Behaviors," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 93(2), pages 215-235, May.


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:jhappi:v:10:y:2009:i:1:p:19-35. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.