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Uncovering the impact of intergenerational income mobility on interpersonal trust

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  • Anna Shaleva

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Abstract

Alluding to theories about relative economic status and behavior, this paper studies if relative income mobility, or the intergenerational change in income positions, affects interpersonal trust. Empirically, the question is brought down to an application with US General Social Survey data. For the identification of a causal relationship, I use a structural approach and estimate a recursive bivariate probit that controls for selection on unobservables. Results suggest that trust increases if children have achieved an upward income movement away from their parents’ income position, and it decreases with the experience of downward income mobility. Policy implications are also discussed. JEL codes: H8; O4; Z00 Copyright Shaleva. 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Anna Shaleva, 2015. "Uncovering the impact of intergenerational income mobility on interpersonal trust," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-17, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:izaldv:v:4:y:2015:i:1:p:1-17:10.1186/s40175-015-0037-3
    DOI: 10.1186/s40175-015-0037-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Zak, Paul J & Knack, Stephen, 2001. "Trust and Growth," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(470), pages 295-321, April.
    2. Laura Chadwick & Gary Solon, 2002. "Intergenerational Income Mobility Among Daughters," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 335-344, March.
    3. Peter Gottschalk, 1997. "Inequality, Income Growth, and Mobility: The Basic Facts," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(2), pages 21-40, Spring.
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    6. La Porta, Rafael, et al, 1997. "Trust in Large Organizations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(2), pages 333-338, May.
    7. Thomas Dohmen & Armin Falk & David Huffman & Uwe Sunde, 2012. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Risk and Trust Attitudes," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(2), pages 645-677.
    8. Gary Solon, 2002. "Cross-Country Differences in Intergenerational Earnings Mobility," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 59-66, Summer.
    9. Aaberge, Rolf, et al, 2002. "Income Inequality and Income Mobility in the Scandinavian Countries Compared to the United States," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 48(4), pages 443-469, December.
    10. Giovanni Millo & Giacomo Pasini, 2010. "Does Social Capital Reduce Moral Hazard? A Network Model for Non-Life Insurance Demand," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 31(3), pages 341-372, September.
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    13. Yann Algan & Pierre Cahuc, 2010. "Inherited Trust and Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(5), pages 2060-2092, December.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Interpersonal trust; Intergenerational income mobility; Recursive bivariate probit; Selection on unobservables;

    JEL classification:

    • H8 - Public Economics - - Miscellaneous Issues
    • O4 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity
    • Z00 - Other Special Topics - - General - - - General

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