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Does Social Capital reduce moral hazard? A network model for non-life insurance demand

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  • Giacomo Pasini

    () (Department of Economics, University Of Venice C� Foscari, Economics and Organization, School for Advanced Studies in Venice)

  • Giovanni Millo

    (Research Department, Generali S.p.A.)

Abstract

We study is the effect of moral hazard involved in non market contracts on the demand for marketed contracts. We extend Arnott and Stiglitz model on the coexistence of market and non-market insurance contracts to allow for the presence of Social Capital as a determinant of the severity of moral hazard in informal contracts. We provide a rigorous definition of Social Network and Social Capital by means of an equilibrium concept typical of the Network literature. Such a formal approach gives us a clear guidance for measuring Social Capital and validate the model on empirical data. The model is estimated on a panel dataset, supporting our claim that Social Capital increases the demand for non-life insurance. We test for the presence of spatial correlation, and conclude that the spatial structure of demand for non-life insurance contracts is completely determined by the spatial distribution of Social Capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Giacomo Pasini & Giovanni Millo, 2006. "Does Social Capital reduce moral hazard? A network model for non-life insurance demand," Working Papers 2006_59, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
  • Handle: RePEc:ven:wpaper:2006_59
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    Cited by:

    1. Francis Kramarz & Oskar Nordström Skans, 2014. "When Strong Ties are Strong: Networks and Youth Labour Market Entry," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 81(3), pages 1164-1200.
    2. Millo, Giovanni, 2014. "Maximum likelihood estimation of spatially and serially correlated panels with random effects," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 914-933.
    3. Anna Shaleva, 2015. "Uncovering the impact of intergenerational income mobility on interpersonal trust," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-17, December.
    4. Paolo Buonanno & Giacomo Pasini & Paolo Vanin, 2012. "Crime and social sanction," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 91(1), pages 193-218, March.
    5. Luciano Lavecchia, 2015. "A note on social capital, space and growth in Europe," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 1017, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Insurance; Social Capital; Network stability; Spatial Panel data model;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • D85 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Network Formation
    • G22 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Insurance; Insurance Companies; Actuarial Studies
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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