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Assessing climate impacts on English economic growth (1645–1740): an econometric approach

Author

Listed:
  • José Luis Martínez-González

    (Faculty of Economics and Business)

  • Jordi Suriñach

    (Faculty of Economics and Business)

  • Gabriel Jover

    (University of Girona)

  • Javier Martín-Vide

    (University of Barcelona)

  • Mariano Barriendos-Vallvé

    (University of Barcelona)

  • Enric Tello

    (Faculty of Economics and Business)

Abstract

British pre-industrial economic growth has traditionally been analysed from the Malthusian point of view and other more optimistic approaches, but in many cases, ignoring environmental factors. This article explores the inclusion of the climate in this general debate, focusing on one of the colder periods of the last 500 years, known as the Maunder Minimum. The provisional results suggest that climate change and the resulting adaptations may have influenced the start of the English Agricultural Revolution, the Energy Transition and the European Divergence. However, from an econometric point of view these results are not fully conclusive, making it necessary to continue working with better primary sources and other alternative methodologies.

Suggested Citation

  • José Luis Martínez-González & Jordi Suriñach & Gabriel Jover & Javier Martín-Vide & Mariano Barriendos-Vallvé & Enric Tello, 2020. "Assessing climate impacts on English economic growth (1645–1740): an econometric approach," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 160(2), pages 233-249, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:climat:v:160:y:2020:i:2:d:10.1007_s10584-019-02633-0
    DOI: 10.1007/s10584-019-02633-0
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