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Tackling alcohol misuse

Author

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  • Anne Ludbrook

    ()

  • Dennis Petrie
  • Lynda McKenzie
  • Shelley Farrar

Abstract

The results suggest that heavier household purchasers of alcohol are most likely to be affected by the introduction of a ‘minimum price per unit of alcohol’ policy. When we focus only on those households that purchase off-trade alcohol, lower income households are the most likely to be affected. However, minimum pricing in the UK is unlikely to be significantly regressive when the effects are considered for the whole population, including those households that do not purchase any off-trade alcohol. Minimum pricing will affect the minority of low-income households that purchase off-trade alcohol and, within this group, those most likely to be affected are households purchasing at a harmful level. Copyright Adis Data Information BV 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Anne Ludbrook & Dennis Petrie & Lynda McKenzie & Shelley Farrar, 2012. "Tackling alcohol misuse," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 51-63, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:aphecp:v:10:y:2012:i:1:p:51-63
    DOI: 10.2165/11594840-000000000-00000
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kunreuther, Howard, 1973. "Why the Poor May Pay More for Food: Theoretical and Empirical Evidence," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 46(3), pages 368-383, July.
    2. Wagenaar, A.C. & Tobler, A.L. & Komro, K.A., 2010. "Effects of alcohol tax and price policies on morbidity and mortality: A systematic review," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 100(11), pages 2270-2278.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nelson, Jon P., 2014. "Binge Drinking, Alcohol Prices, And Alcohol Taxes," Working Papers 164652, American Association of Wine Economists.
    2. Christopher Doran & Joshua Byrnes, 2012. "The role of health economics in alcohol policy," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 10(1), pages 33-35, January.
    3. Jon Nelson, 2015. "Binge drinking and alcohol prices: a systematic review of age-related results from econometric studies, natural experiments and field studies," Health Economics Review, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 1-13, December.

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