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Welcome to the Machine: A Model of Legislator Personality and Communications Technology Adoption

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  • Gary E. Hollibaugh Jr.
  • Adam J. Ramey
  • Jonathan D. Klingler

Abstract

Political scientists have long considered ideology, partisanship, and constituency in determining how members of the United States Congress make decisions. Meanwhile, psychologists have held that personality traits play central roles in decision making. Here, we bridge these literatures by offering a framework for modeling how personality influences legislative behavior. Drawing from experimental economics and neuropsychology, we identify core cognitive constraints for the “Big Five†personality model, parameterizing them in ways useful for crafting formal models of legislative behavior. We then show one example of the applicability of this framework by creating a formal decision-theoretic model of constituency communication. We show that when there exists uncertainty over the true state of the world, personality traits have more influence on individual decisions.

Suggested Citation

  • Gary E. Hollibaugh Jr. & Adam J. Ramey & Jonathan D. Klingler, 2018. "Welcome to the Machine: A Model of Legislator Personality and Communications Technology Adoption," SAGE Open, , vol. 8(3), pages 21582440188, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:sagope:v:8:y:2018:i:3:p:2158244018802883
    DOI: 10.1177/2158244018802883
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    References listed on IDEAS

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