IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/sae/jospec/v7y2006i4p408-415.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Stationarity and Major League Baseball Attendance Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Rodney Fort

    (Washington State University)

  • Young Hoon Lee

    (Hansung University)

Abstract

If a sports time series, such as attendance, is nonstationary, then the use of level data (e.g., demand estimation using panel data) leads to biased estimates, and the direction of the bias is unknown. In past works, authors have failed to reject nonstationary data, taken first differences, and proceeded with further analysis. That is a legitimate approach, although limiting (e.g., no elasticity estimates can be had from first differences). However, if the data are stationary, then all is well with the usual applications to level data (e.g., taking logs gives direct elasticity estimates). This article rejects that the Major League Baseball attendance time series is nonstationary with break points and suggests the break points deserve additional analysis to facilitate attendance demand investigations.

Suggested Citation

  • Rodney Fort & Young Hoon Lee, 2006. "Stationarity and Major League Baseball Attendance Analysis," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 7(4), pages 408-415, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:jospec:v:7:y:2006:i:4:p:408-415
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://jse.sagepub.com/content/7/4/408.abstract
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Kaplan David, 2008. "Univariate and Multivariate Autoregressive Time Series Models of Offensive Baseball Performance: 1901-2005," Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports, De Gruyter, vol. 4(3), pages 1-23, July.
    2. Karanfil, Fatih, 2017. "An empirical analysis of European football rivalries based on on-field performances," Sport Management Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(5), pages 468-482.
    3. Steven Salaga & Rodney Fort, 2017. "Structural Change in Competitive Balance in Big-Time College Football," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 50(1), pages 27-41, February.
    4. Rodney Fort & Young Hoon Lee, 2007. "Structural Change, Competitive Balance, And The Rest Of The Major Leagues," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(3), pages 519-532, July.
    5. Nieswiadomy Michael L. & Strazicich Mark C. & Clayton Stephen, 2012. "Was There a Structural Break in Barry Bonds's Bat?," Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports, De Gruyter, vol. 8(3), pages 1-19, October.
    6. Jaume García & Plácido Rodríguez, 2013. "The determinants of football match attendance in Spanish football: an empirical analysis," Chapters,in: The Econometrics of Sport, chapter 9, pages 154-166 Edward Elgar Publishing.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sae:jospec:v:7:y:2006:i:4:p:408-415. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (SAGE Publications). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.