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An empirical analysis of European football rivalries based on on-field performances

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  • Fatih Karanfil

    () (EconomiX - UPN - Université Paris Nanterre - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

Unlike previous research on the concept of rivalry, the specific focus of this study is on the dynamic relationships between on-field performances of rival clubs. The author analyzes causality structures between league performances of major rival clubs in Europe’s leading divisions in order to assess whether the rivalry between two clubs establishes causality between their performances. The results show that causal relationships hold for less than half of the rivalries, and most of these rivalries involve a success brings success type of dynamic relationship. These findings imply some of the football rivalries in Europe had their roots in other sources than performance, and when devising their strategies, sport managers should take measures to avoid substantial decoupling of team performances from fans’ perceptions.
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Suggested Citation

  • Fatih Karanfil, 2017. "An empirical analysis of European football rivalries based on on-field performances," Post-Print hal-01549787, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:hal-01549787
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01549787
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