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The Impact of Labor Strikes on Consumer Demand: An Application to Professional Sports

Author

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  • Martin B. Schmidt
  • David J. Berri

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Martin B. Schmidt & David J. Berri, 2004. "The Impact of Labor Strikes on Consumer Demand: An Application to Professional Sports," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(1), pages 344-357, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:94:y:2004:i:1:p:344-357
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/000282804322970841
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Brian E. Becker & Craig A. Olson, 1986. "The Impact of Strikes on Shareholder Equity," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 39(3), pages 425-438, April.
    2. Ashenfelter, Orley & Johnson, George E, 1969. "Bargaining Theory, Trade Unions, and Industrial Strike Activity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 59(1), pages 35-49, March.
    3. Richard A. De Fusco & Scott M. Fuess Jr., 1991. "The Effects of Airline Strikes on Struck and Nonstruck Carriers," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 44(2), pages 324-333, January.
    4. Andrews, Donald W K, 1989. "Power in Econometric Applications," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(5), pages 1059-1090, September.
    5. Richard McHugh, 1991. "Productivity Effects of Strikes in Struck and Nonstruck Industries," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 44(4), pages 722-732, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan Gruber & Samuel A. Kleiner, 2012. "Do Strikes Kill? Evidence from New York State," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 4(1), pages 127-157, February.
    2. Eiji Yamamura, 2011. "Game Information, Local Heroes, and Their Effect on Attendance: The Case of the Japanese Baseball League," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 12(1), pages 20-35, February.
    3. Victor Matheson, 2006. "The effects of labour strikes on consumer demand in professional sports: revisited," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(10), pages 1173-1179.
    4. Brian Mills & Rodney Fort, 2014. "League-Level Attendance And Outcome Uncertainty In U.S. Pro Sports Leagues," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(1), pages 205-218, January.
    5. Franc J.G.M. Klaasen & Jan R. Magnus, 2006. "Are Economic Agents Successful Optimizers? An Analysis through Service Strategy in Tennis," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 06-048/2, Tinbergen Institute.
    6. Young Hoon Lee, 2013. "Estimation of temporal variations in fan loyalty: application of multi-factor models," Chapters,in: The Econometrics of Sport, chapter 8, pages 135-153 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    7. Young Hoon Lee, 2009. "The Impact of Postseason Restructuring on the Competitive Balance and Fan Demand in Major League Baseball," Working Papers 0901, Research Institute for Market Economy, Sogang University, revised 2009.
    8. yamamura, eiji, 2008. "Game Information, Local Heroes, And Their Effect On Attendance: The Case Of The Japanese Baseball League," MPRA Paper 10303, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Dennis Coates & Thane Harrison, 2004. "Baseball Strikes and the Demand for Attendance," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 04-101, UMBC Department of Economics.
    10. Victor Matheson, 2004. "The Effects of Labor Strikes on Consumer Demand: A Re-examination of Major League Baseball," Working Papers 0405, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
    11. Nieswiadomy Michael L. & Strazicich Mark C. & Clayton Stephen, 2012. "Was There a Structural Break in Barry Bonds's Bat?," Journal of Quantitative Analysis in Sports, De Gruyter, vol. 8(3), pages 1-19, October.
    12. Rodney Fort & Young Hoon Lee, 2013. "Major League Baseball attendance time series: league policy lessons," Chapters,in: The Econometrics of Sport, chapter 2, pages 35-50 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    13. Young Lee & Rodney Fort, 2008. "Attendance and the Uncertainty-of-Outcome Hypothesis in Baseball," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 33(4), pages 281-295, December.
    14. Ira Horowitz, 2007. "If you play well they will come-and vice versa: bidirectional causality in major-league baseball," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(2), pages 93-105.
    15. Klaassen, F.J.G.M. & Magnus, J.R., 2006. "Are Economic Agents Successful Optimizers? An Analysis Through Strategy in Tennis," Discussion Paper 2006-52, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    16. Young Hoon Lee & Yongdai Kim & Sara Kim, 2016. "A Bias-Corrected Estimator of Competitive Balance in Sports Leagues," Working Papers 1611, Research Institute for Market Economy, Sogang University.
    17. Rodney Fort & Young Hoon Lee, 2007. "Structural Change, Competitive Balance, And The Rest Of The Major Leagues," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(3), pages 519-532, July.
    18. Young H. Lee & Trenton G. Smith, 2008. "Why Are Americans Addicted To Baseball? An Empirical Analysis Of Fandom In Korea And The United States," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 26(1), pages 32-48, January.
    19. Tony Caporale & Trevor Collier, 2015. "Are We Getting Better or Are They Getting Worse? Draft Position, Strength of Schedule, and Competitive Balance in the National Football League," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 291-300, September.
    20. Klaassen, Franc J.G.M. & Magnus, Jan R., 2009. "The efficiency of top agents: An analysis through service strategy in tennis," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 148(1), pages 72-85, January.
    21. Craig A. Depken II & Peter A. Groothuis & Mark C. Strazicich, 2016. "The Rise and Fall of the Enforcer in the National Hockey League," Working Papers 16-12, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.

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