IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/sae/inrsre/v26y2003i3p223-243.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Spatial Econometric Data Analysis: Moving Beyond Traditional Models

Author

Listed:
  • Raymond J. G. M. Florax
  • Arno J. Van der Vlist

Abstract

This article appraises recent advances in the spatial econometric literature. It serves as the introduction to a collection of new papers on spatial econometric data analysis brought together in this special issue, dealing specifically with new extensions to the spatial econometric modeling perspective. Although the initial development of the field of spatial econometrics has been rather slow, the Dixit-Stiglitz revolution and the emergence of the New Economy Geography have been instrumental in uplifting the significance and the use of spatial data analysis techniques. Concurrent developments in other social sciences parallel this situation in economics. The upsurge in spatial econometrics is, among other things, driven by the recognition that traditional spatial econometric models are insufficient to capture modern theoretical developments. Therefore, this issue brings together a collection of articles on space-time and discrete choice modeling, spatial nonstationarity, and the methodology and empirics of regional economic growth models.

Suggested Citation

  • Raymond J. G. M. Florax & Arno J. Van der Vlist, 2003. "Spatial Econometric Data Analysis: Moving Beyond Traditional Models," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 26(3), pages 223-243, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:inrsre:v:26:y:2003:i:3:p:223-243
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://irx.sagepub.com/content/26/3/223.abstract
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Liu, Shuangzhe & Ma, Tiefeng & Polasek, Wolfgang, 2014. "Spatial system estimators for panel models: A sensitivity and simulation study," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 78-102.
    2. repec:kap:mktlet:v:29:y:2018:i:2:d:10.1007_s11002-018-9451-z is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Johan Lundberg, 2006. "Spatial interaction model of spillovers from locally provided public services," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(6), pages 631-644.
    4. Martin Andersson & Urban Gråsjö, 2009. "Spatial dependence and the representation of space in empirical models," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 43(1), pages 159-180, March.
    5. Luc Anselin & Julie Le Gallo, 2006. "Interpolation of Air Quality Measures in Hedonic House Price Models: Spatial Aspects This paper is part of a joint research effort with James Murdoch (University of Texas, Dallas) and Mark Thayer (San," Spatial Economic Analysis, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 31-52.
    6. Kathleen P. Bell & Timothy J. Dalton, 2007. "Spatial Economic Analysis in Data‐Rich Environments," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(3), pages 487-501, September.
    7. Adjemian, Michael K. & Cynthia Lin, C.-Y. & Williams, Jeffrey, 2010. "Estimating spatial interdependence in automobile type choice with survey data," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(9), pages 661-675, November.
    8. Simonetta Longhi & Peter Nijkamp, 2005. "Forecasting Regional Labour Market Developments Under Spatial Heterogeneity and Spatial Autocorrelation," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-041/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    9. Paul Voss, 2007. "Demography as a Spatial Social Science," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 26(5), pages 457-476, December.
    10. Mitze, Timo, 2010. "Network Dependency in Migration Flows – A Space-time Analysis for Germany since Re-unification," Ruhr Economic Papers 205, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    11. Stephanié Rossouw & Don J. Webber, 2012. "Sub-national vulnerability and relative location: A case study of South Africa," Working Papers 2012-01, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.
    12. Guangqing Chi & Jun Zhu, 2008. "Spatial Regression Models for Demographic Analysis," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 27(1), pages 17-42, February.
    13. Longhi, Simonetta & Nijkamp, Peter, 2006. "Forecasting regional labor market developments under spatial heterogeneity and spatial correlation," Serie Research Memoranda 0015, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    14. Simonetta Longhi & Peter Nijkamp, 2007. "Forecasting Regional Labor Market Developments under Spatial Autocorrelation," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 30(2), pages 100-119, April.
    15. David Maddison, 2007. "Modelling sulphur emissions in Europe: a spatial econometric approach," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(4), pages 726-743, October.
    16. Celbis M.G. & Crombrugghe D.P.I. de, 2014. "Can internet infrastructure help reduce regional disparities? : evidence from Turkey," MERIT Working Papers 078, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    17. David Maddison, 2009. "A Spatio‐temporal Model of Farmland Values," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(1), pages 171-189, February.
    18. Matias Mayor Fernandez & Esteban Fernandez Vazquez & Jorge Rodriguez Valez, 2006. "Spatial Structures and Spatial Spillovers: A GME Approach," ERSA conference papers ersa06p777, European Regional Science Association.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:sae:inrsre:v:26:y:2003:i:3:p:223-243. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (SAGE Publications). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.