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Inequality, SES, economic indicators, and student achievement

Author

Listed:
  • John J. McCreary

    (Ball State University)

  • Julianne M. Edwards

    (Ball State University)

  • Gregory J. Marchant

    () (Ball State University)

Abstract

HLM model fit was used to determine the relationship of the country level economic variables of GDP and the GINI Index to 2012 student PISA reading, math, and science achievement, along with individual SES, country SES mean, and country SES inequality. For all achievement areas the complete model of all variables represented the best fit. The significant predictors in the models were country SES inequality and student SES. This suggested a less direct relationship to achievement for the economic indicators of GDP and GINI, and demonstrated the significance of SES inequality related to student achievement.

Suggested Citation

  • John J. McCreary & Julianne M. Edwards & Gregory J. Marchant, 2015. "Inequality, SES, economic indicators, and student achievement," Review of Applied Socio-Economic Research, Pro Global Science Association, vol. 9(1), pages 58-65, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:rse:wpaper:v:9:y:2015:i:1:p:58-65
    as

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    File URL: http://reaser.eu/RePec/rse/wpaper/REASER9_6Marchand_P58-65.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic inequality; socio-economic status; student achievement; international;

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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