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The effect of peer socioeconomic status on student achievement: a meta-analysis

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  • Ewijk, R. van
  • Sleegers, P

Abstract

Previous studies on the effects on students' test scores of their peers' socioeconomic status (SES) reported varying results. A meta-regression analysis including 30 studies on the topic shows that the compositional effect that researchers find is strongly related to how they measure SES and to their model choice. If they measure SES dichotomously (e.g. free lunch eligibility) or include several average SES-variables in one model, they find smaller effects than when using a composite that captures several SES-dimensions. Composition measured at cohort/school level is associated with smaller effects than composition measured at class level. Researchers estimating compositional effects without controlling for prior achievement or not taking into account the potential for omitted variables bias, risk overestimating the effect. Correcting for a large set of not well thought-over covariates may lead to an underestimation of the compositional effect, by artificially explaining away the effect. Little evidence was found that effect sizes differ with sample characteristics such as test type (language vs. math) and country. Estimates for a hypothetical study, making a number of "ideal" choices, suggest that peer SES may be an important determinant of academic achievement.

Suggested Citation

  • Ewijk, R. van & Sleegers, P, "undated". "The effect of peer socioeconomic status on student achievement: a meta-analysis," Working Papers 20, Top Institute for Evidence Based Education Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:tir:wpaper:20
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Ong C. & Witte K. de, 2013. "The influence of ethnic segregation and school mobility in primary education on high school dropout : evidence from regression discontinuity at a contextual tipping point," MERIT Working Papers 064, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Leuven, Edwin & Oosterbeek, Hessel, 2011. "Overeducation and Mismatch in the Labor Market," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier.
    3. Jaap Dronkers & Rolf van der Velden, 2012. "Positive but also negative effects of ethnic diversity in schools on educational performance? An empirical test using PISA data," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 1211, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
    4. Dronkers, Jaap, 2010. "Positive but also negative effects of ethnic diversity in schools on educational performance? An empirical test using cross-national PISA data," MPRA Paper 25598, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. John J. McCreary & Julianne M. Edwards & Gregory J. Marchant, 2015. "Inequality, SES, economic indicators, and student achievement," Review of Applied Socio-Economic Research, Pro Global Science Association, vol. 9(1), pages 58-65, June.
    6. F. Aleskerov & I. Frumin & E. Kardanova, 2016. "Heterogeneity of the educational system: an introduction to the problem," Papers 1701.07322, arXiv.org.
    7. Dronkers, Jaap, 2010. "Positieve maar ook negatieve effecten van etnische diversiteit in scholen op onderwijsprestaties? Een empirische toets met internationale PISA-data
      [Positive but also negative effects of ethnic div
      ," MPRA Paper 23824, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Zwick, Thomas, 2012. "Determinants of individual academic achievement: Group selectivity effects have many dimensions," ZEW Discussion Papers 12-081, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    9. repec:taf:vjerxx:v:109:y:2016:i:1:p:37-49 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Tommaso Agasisti & Patrizia Falzetti & Mara Soncin, 2016. "Italian school principals’ managerial behaviors and students’ test scores: an empirical analysis," Working papers 43, Società Italiana di Economia Pubblica.
    11. Tommaso Agasisti & Sergio Longobardi, 2012. "Inequality in education: can Italian disadvantaged students close the gap? A focus on resilience in the Italian school system," Working Papers 2012/39, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    12. Cain Polidano & Barbara Hanel & Hielke Buddelmeyer, 2012. "Explaining the SES School Completion Gap," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2012n16, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.

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