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The Political Economy of Entry Barriers

Author

Listed:
  • Toshihiko Mukoyama

    (University of Virginia)

  • Latchezar Popov

    (University of Virginia)

Abstract

We study a political economy model of entry barriers. Each period the policymaker determines whether to impose a high barrier to entry, and the special interest groups try to influence the policymaker's decision. Entry is accompanied by creative destruction - when many new firms enter, old firms are more likely to be driven out of the market. Therefore the current incumbents (industry leaders) tend to lobby for a higher entry barrier and potential entrants (industry followers) are likely to lobby for a freer environment for entry. We analyze both static and dynamic versions of the model to examine what kind of environment supports a policy that blocks entry. In the dynamic model, the economy can exhibit various different dynamics. In particular, multiple steady states may arise in equilibrium. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Toshihiko Mukoyama & Latchezar Popov, 2014. "The Political Economy of Entry Barriers," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 17(3), pages 383-416, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:12-249
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2013.11.002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Political economy; Lobbying; Entry and exit;

    JEL classification:

    • D72 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Political Processes: Rent-seeking, Lobbying, Elections, Legislatures, and Voting Behavior
    • E60 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - General
    • L51 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - Economics of Regulation
    • O25 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Industrial Policy

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