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Gender, small firm ownership, and credit access: some insights from India

Author

Listed:
  • Kausik Chaudhuri

    () (Leeds University)

  • Subash Sasidharan

    () (Indian Institute of Technology Madras)

  • Rajesh Seethamma Natarajan Raj

    () (Sikkim University)

Abstract

Using a comprehensive dataset on micro, small, and medium enterprises in India, we examine whether the gender of the owner matters in firm performance and in credit access from institutional sources. The study finds significant underperformance in the size, growth, and efficiency of firms owned by women when compared to those owned by men. In line with the evidence in the existing literature, our findings also support the view that women-owned firms are disadvantaged in the market for small-business credit. These findings suggest that addressing gender discrimination in the small-business credit market could help, partly, in bridging the performance gap between male- and female-owned firms.

Suggested Citation

  • Kausik Chaudhuri & Subash Sasidharan & Rajesh Seethamma Natarajan Raj, 2020. "Gender, small firm ownership, and credit access: some insights from India," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 54(4), pages 1165-1181, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:sbusec:v:54:y:2020:i:4:d:10.1007_s11187-018-0124-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s11187-018-0124-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ferdinando Giglio, 2020. "Access to Credit and Women Entrepreneurs: A Systematic Literature Review," European Research Studies Journal, European Research Studies Journal, vol. 0(4), pages 312-335.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender; Small firms; Access to finance; India;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • L25 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Performance
    • N65 - Economic History - - Manufacturing and Construction - - - Asia including Middle East
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship

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