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How can gender discrimination explain fertility behaviors and family-friendly policies?

  • Magali Recoules

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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11150-010-9109-y
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    Article provided by Springer in its journal Review of Economics of the Household.

    Volume (Year): 9 (2011)
    Issue (Month): 4 (December)
    Pages: 505-521

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    Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:9:y:2011:i:4:p:505-521
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=109451

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    1. Judith K. Hellerstein & David Neumark & Kenneth R. Troske, 1997. "Market Forces and Sex Discrimination," NBER Working Papers 6321, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Graciela Chichilnisky, 2008. "The Gender Gap," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 12(4), pages 828-844, November.
    3. Namkee Ahn & Pedro Mira, . "A note on the changing relationship between fertility and female employment rates in developed countries," Studies on the Spanish Economy 13, FEDEA.
    4. Almudena Sevilla-Sanz & Cristina Fernandez, 2006. "Social Norms and Household Time Allocation," Economics Series Working Papers 291, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    5. Dennis J. Aigner & Glen G. Cain, 1977. "Statistical theories of discrimination in labor markets," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 30(2), pages 175-187, January.
    6. Raquel Fernández & Alessandra Fogli & Claudia Olivetti, 2004. "Mothers and Sons: Preference Formation and Female Labor Force Dynamics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 119(4), pages 1249-1299, November.
    7. Cavalcanti, Tiago & Tavares, José, 2006. "Women Prefer Larger Governments: Growth, Structural Transformation and Government Size," CEPR Discussion Papers 5667, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Alícia Adserà, 2004. "Changing fertility rates in developed countries. The impact of labor market institutions," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 17-43, February.
    9. Havet, Nathalie, 2004. "Écarts salariaux et disparités professionnelles entre sexes : développements théoriques et validité empirique," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 80(1), pages 5-39, Mars.
    10. Ponthieux S. & Meurs D., 2005. "The Gender Wage Gap in Europe: Women, Men and the Public Sector," Working Papers ERMES 0504, ERMES, University Paris 2.
    11. Oded Galor & David N. Weil, 1993. "The Gender Gap, Fertility, and Growth," NBER Working Papers 4550, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Alesina, Alberto & Ichino, Andrea & Karabarbounis, Loukas, 2007. "Gender Based Taxation and the Division of Family Chores," IZA Discussion Papers 3233, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Francois, Patrick, 1998. "Gender discrimination without gender difference: theory and policy responses," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 1-32, April.
    14. Bettio, Francesca & Villa, Paola, 1998. "A Mediterranean Perspective on the Breakdown of the Relationship between Participation and Fertility," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(2), pages 137-71, March.
    15. Hellerstein, Judith K & Neumark, David & Troske, Kenneth R, 1999. "Wages, Productivity, and Worker Characteristics: Evidence from Plant-Level Production Functions and Wage Equations," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(3), pages 409-46, July.
    16. Patricia Apps & Ray Rees, 2010. "Fertility, Female Labor Supply and Public Policy," Working Papers id:2754, eSocialSciences.
    17. De Tray, Dennis N, 1973. "Child Quality and the Demand for Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages S70-95, Part II, .
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