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In-Home Training and the Production of Children's Human Capital

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  • Arleen Leibowitz

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Abstract

This paper adapts the idea of on-the-job training (OJT) to investments that families make in children before formal schooling begins. Like OJT, in-home training occurs in informal settings, requires costly time inputs and is complementary with formal schooling. In addition to choosing among home production, leisure, and market work, parents also choose which particular home activities to pursue. That working mothers dramatically reduce the time they devote to leisure, sleep, and other home activities in order to preserve their time in human capital-building activities with children, illustrates and validates the home production framework. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2003

Suggested Citation

  • Arleen Leibowitz, 2003. "In-Home Training and the Production of Children's Human Capital," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 1(4), pages 305-317, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:reveho:v:1:y:2003:i:4:p:305-317
    DOI: 10.1023/B:REHO.0000004791.30664.ef
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Rapoport, Hillel & Vidal, Jean-Pierre, 2007. "Economic growth and endogenous intergenerational altruism," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(7-8), pages 1231-1246, August.
    2. Zhu, Guozhong & Vural, Gulfer, 2013. "Inter-generational effect of parental time and its policy implications," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 1833-1851.
    3. Seung Mo Choi, 2008. "How Large are Learning Externalities? Measurement by Calibration," Working Papers 2008-26, School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University.
    4. Rasmussen, Astrid Würtz, 2009. "Allocation of Parental Time and the Long-Term E¤ect on Children's Education," Working Papers 09-22, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    5. Alessandra Casarico & Alessandro Sommacal, 2012. "Labor Income Taxation, Human Capital, and Growth: The Role of Childcare," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 114(4), pages 1182-1207, December.
    6. Mark E. McGovern & Slawa Rokicki, 2017. "Heterogeneity in Early Life Investments: A Longitudinal Analysis of Children’s Time Use," Working Papers 201703, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.

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    Keywords

    children; human capital; home production;

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