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The benefits and costs of ethanol: an evaluation of the government’s analysis

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  • Robert Hahn

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  • Caroline Cecot

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Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Robert Hahn & Caroline Cecot, 2009. "The benefits and costs of ethanol: an evaluation of the government’s analysis," Journal of Regulatory Economics, Springer, vol. 35(3), pages 275-295, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:regeco:v:35:y:2009:i:3:p:275-295
    DOI: 10.1007/s11149-008-9080-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kirchhoff, Stefanie & Colby, Bonnie G. & LaFrance, Jeffrey T., 1997. "Evaluating the Performance of Benefit Transfer: An Empirical Inquiry," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 75-93, May.
    2. Martin Feldstein, 1999. "Tax Avoidance And The Deadweight Loss Of The Income Tax," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 81(4), pages 674-680, November.
    3. Elobeid Amani & Hart Chad, 2007. "Ethanol Expansion in the Food versus Fuel Debate: How Will Developing Countries Fare?," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 5(2), pages 1-23, December.
    4. Hazilla, Michael & Kopp, Raymond J, 1990. "Social Cost of Environmental Quality Regulations: A General Equilibrium Analysis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(4), pages 853-873, August.
    5. Roy Brouwer & Frank Spaninks, 1999. "The Validity of Environmental Benefits Transfer: Further Empirical Testing," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 14(1), pages 95-117, July.
    6. Robert W. Hahn & Paul C. Tetlock, 2008. "Has Economic Analysis Improved Regulatory Decisions?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 22(1), pages 67-84, Winter.
    7. Searchinger, Timothy & Heimlich, Ralph & Houghton, R. A. & Dong, Fengxia & Elobeid, Amani & Fabiosa, Jacinto F. & Tokgoz, Simla & Hayes, Dermot J. & Yu, Hun-Hsiang, 2008. "Use of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from Land-Use Change," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12881, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    8. Niven, Robert K., 2005. "Ethanol in gasoline: environmental impacts and sustainability review article," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 9(6), pages 535-555, December.
    9. Muller, Nicholas Z. & Mendelsohn, Robert, 2007. "Measuring the damages of air pollution in the United States," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 1-14, July.
    10. Westcott, Paul C., 2007. "U.S. Ethanol Expansion Driving Changes Throughout the Agricultural Sector," Amber Waves, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, September.
    11. Miranowski, John, 2007. "Biofuel Incentives and the Energy Title of the 2007 Farm Bill," Staff General Research Papers Archive 12821, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    12. Lawrence H. Goulder & Roberton C. Williams III, 2003. "The Substantial Bias from Ignoring General Equilibrium Effects in Estimating Excess Burden, and a Practical Solution," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(4), pages 898-927, August.
    13. Fapri, 2007. "Economic Impacts of Not Extending Biofuels Subsidies," FAPRI-MU Report Series 42189, Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute at University of Missouri.
    14. Miranowski, John A, 2007. "Biofuel Incentives and the Energy Title of the 2007 Farm Bill," ISU General Staff Papers 200705170700001565, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    15. Parry, Ian & Darmstadter, Joel, 2003. "The Costs of U.S. Oil Dependency," Discussion Papers dp-03-59, Resources For the Future.
    16. Broadman, Harry G., 1986. "The social cost of imported oil," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 242-252, June.
    17. Huntington, Hillard G., 2003. "Energy disruptions, interfirm price effects and the aggregate economy," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 119-136, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lapan, Harvey & Moschini, GianCarlo, 2012. "Second-best biofuel policies and the welfare effects of quantity mandates and subsidies," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 224-241.
    2. Qiu, Cheng & Colson, Gregory & Wetzstein, Michael, 2014. "An ethanol blend wall shift is prone to increase petroleum gasoline demand," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 160-165.
    3. Hodge, Timothy R., 2011. "The Effect of Ethanol Plants on Residential Property Values: Evidence from Michigan," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 41(2).
    4. Perdiguero, Jordi & Jiménez, Juan Luis, 2011. "Sell or not sell biodiesel: Local competition and government measures," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 1525-1532, April.
    5. Jaeger, William K. & Egelkraut, Thorsten M., 2011. "Biofuel economics in a setting of multiple objectives and unintended consequences," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(9), pages 4320-4333.
    6. Geoffrey Heal, 2009. "The Economics of Renewable Energy," NBER Working Papers 15081, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Benefit-cost analysis; Regulation; Energy policy; Environmental economics; Ethanol; D61; D78; L50; Q48; Q5;

    JEL classification:

    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis
    • D78 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Positive Analysis of Policy Formulation and Implementation
    • L50 - Industrial Organization - - Regulation and Industrial Policy - - - General
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics

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