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Blair disease? Business careers of the former democratic heads of state and government

Author

Listed:
  • Alexander Baturo

    () (Dublin City University)

  • Slava Mikhaylov

    () (University College London)

Abstract

Abstract Examining the careers of democratic heads of state and government from 1960–2010, we find that one in every seven turns to the private sector after office. Distinguishing between the factors that attract leaders to business and those that render leaders attractive, we find that the global CEO compensation rates, cultural norms, having served in office in Anglo-Saxon countries as well as their personal background matter. We also find that certain economic outcomes and policies in office such as economic growth and reduction in state spending are often associated with post-tenure business careers. We do not find evidence, however, that leaders are able to implement policies with future careers in mind, which would in turn raise concerns over accountability.

Suggested Citation

  • Alexander Baturo & Slava Mikhaylov, 2016. "Blair disease? Business careers of the former democratic heads of state and government," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 166(3), pages 335-354, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:166:y:2016:i:3:d:10.1007_s11127-016-0325-8
    DOI: 10.1007/s11127-016-0325-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Federico Quaresima & Fabio Fiorillo & Raffaella Santolini, 2018. "Does Political Affiliation Matter On Post-Parliamentary Careers In The Boards Of Public Enterprises?," Working Papers 429, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    2. Alexander Baturo, 2016. "Cursus Honorum: Personal Background, Careers and Experience of Political Leaders in Democracy and Dictatorship—New Data and Analyses," Politics and Governance, Cogitatio Press, vol. 4(2), pages 138-157.
    3. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:7:p:2425-:d:157468 is not listed on IDEAS

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