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Global economic crisis and corruption

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  • Artjoms Ivlevs

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  • Timothy Hinks

    ()

Abstract

We study the effects of the 2008–2009 global economic crisis on the household experience of bribing public officials. The data come from the Life in Transition-2 survey, conducted in 2010 in 30 post-socialist economies of Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia. We find that households hit by crisis are more likely to bribe and, among people who bribe, crisis victims bribe a wider range of public officials than non-victims. The crisis victims are also more likely to pay bribes because public officials ask them to do so and less likely because of gratitude. The link between crisis and bribery is stronger in the poorest countries of the region. Our findings support the conjecture that public officials misuse sensitive information about crisis victims to inform bribe extortion decisions. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Artjoms Ivlevs & Timothy Hinks, 2015. "Global economic crisis and corruption," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 162(3), pages 425-445, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:pubcho:v:162:y:2015:i:3:p:425-445
    DOI: 10.1007/s11127-014-0213-z
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Artjoms Ivlevs, 2017. "Adverse Welfare Shocks and Pro-Environmental Behaviour: Evidence from the Global Economic Crisis," Working Papers id:12260, eSocialSciences.
    2. Mehmet Okan Ta?ar & Sava? Çevik, 2015. "Cultural Determinants of Corruption and Bribery: A Cross-Country Comparison," Proceedings of International Academic Conferences 2504043, International Institute of Social and Economic Sciences.
    3. repec:kap:pubcho:v:171:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11127-017-0442-z is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Ivlevs, Artjoms, 2017. "Adverse Welfare Shocks and Pro-Environmental Behaviour: Evidence from the Global Economic Crisis," IZA Discussion Papers 11133, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Ivlevs, Artjoms & Hinks, Timothy, 2018. "Former Communist Party Membership and Bribery in the Post-Socialist Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 11594, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corruption; Bribery; Global economic crisis; Transition economies; D73; E32; P35;

    JEL classification:

    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • P35 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - Public Finance

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