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The impact of skills, working time allocation and peer effects on the entrepreneurial intentions of scientists

Listed author(s):
  • Petra Moog

    ()

  • Arndt Werner
  • Stefan Houweling

    ()

  • Uschi Backes-Gellner

Little is currently known about the effects of skill composition on academic entrepreneurship. Therefore, in this paper, following Lazear’s (J Labor Econ 23(4):649–680, 2005 ) jack-of-all-trades approach, we study how the composition of a scientist’s skills affects his or her intention to become an entrepreneur. Extending Lazear, we examine how the effect of balanced skills is moderated by a balance in working time and peer effects. Using unique data collected from 480 life sciences researchers in Switzerland and Germany, we provide first evidence that scientists with more diverse and balanced skills are more likely to have higher entrepreneurial intentions, but only if they also balance their working time and are in contact with entrepreneurial peers. Therefore, to encourage the entrepreneurial intentions of life scientists, it must be ensured that scientists are exposed to several types of work experience, have balanced working time allocations across different activities, and work with entrepreneurial peers; e.g., collaborating with colleagues or academic scientists who have started new ventures in the past. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10961-014-9347-x
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Article provided by Springer in its journal The Journal of Technology Transfer.

Volume (Year): 40 (2015)
Issue (Month): 3 (June)
Pages: 493-511

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:40:y:2015:i:3:p:493-511
DOI: 10.1007/s10961-014-9347-x
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Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/business+%26+management/journal/10961/PS2

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