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Scientist entrepreneurship across scientific fields

Listed author(s):
  • T. Aldridge

    ()

  • David Audretsch

    ()

  • Sameeksha Desai

    ()

  • Venkata Nadella

    ()

Knowledge generated in universities can serve as an important base for the commercialization of innovation. One mechanism for commercialization is the creation of a new company by a scientist. We shed light on this process by examining the role of scientist characteristics, access to resources and key university conditions in driving the likelihood of a scientist to start a company. Our sample comprises 1,899 university scientists across six different scientific fields. We make a methodological contribution by using self-reported data from the scientists themselves, whereas most previous research relied on university or public data. Our consideration of six scientific fields is a substantive contribution and reveals that scientist startups are heterogeneous in nature. Our findings are largely consistent with extant research on the role of individual and university variables in scientist entrepreneurship; in addition, we uncover the novel finding that the type of research field is also a key driver of scientist startup activity. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10961-014-9339-x
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Article provided by Springer in its journal The Journal of Technology Transfer.

Volume (Year): 39 (2014)
Issue (Month): 6 (December)
Pages: 819-835

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Handle: RePEc:kap:jtecht:v:39:y:2014:i:6:p:819-835
DOI: 10.1007/s10961-014-9339-x
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com

Order Information: Web: http://www.springer.com/business+%26+management/journal/10961/PS2

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