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A new industry creation and originality: Insight from the funding sources of university patents

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  • Guerzoni, Marco
  • Taylor Aldridge, T.
  • Audretsch, David B.
  • Desai, Sameeksha

Abstract

Scientific breakthroughs coming from universities can contribute to the emergence of new industries, such as in the case of biotechnology. Obviously, not all research conducted in universities leads to a radical change from existing technological trajectories. Patents and patent dynamics have long been recognized as critical in understanding the emergence of new technologies and industries. Specifically, patent citations provide insight into the originality of a discovery that has received patent protection. Yet while a large body of literature addresses the impact of patent originality on various firm performance measures, we address the question of what conditions drive patent originality in the process of knowledge creation within the university. Using data on patented cancer research, we examine how research context – as reflected by the funding source for each scientist – is associated with patent originality. We find that when university scientists are partly funded by their own university, they have a higher propensity to generate more original patents. By contrast, university scientists funded either by industry or other non-university organizations have a lower propensity to generate more original patents. The significance of our findings in the cancer research setting call for further research on this question in other research fields.

Suggested Citation

  • Guerzoni, Marco & Taylor Aldridge, T. & Audretsch, David B. & Desai, Sameeksha, 2014. "A new industry creation and originality: Insight from the funding sources of university patents," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(10), pages 1697-1706.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:respol:v:43:y:2014:i:10:p:1697-1706
    DOI: 10.1016/j.respol.2014.07.009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Krafft, Jackie & Lechevalier, Sebastien & Quatraro, Francesco & Storz, Cornelia, 2014. "Emergence and evolution of new industries: The path-dependent dynamics of knowledge creation. An introduction to the special section," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(10), pages 1663-1665.
    2. David B. Audretsch & Erik E. Lehmann & Matthias Menter, 2016. "Public cluster policy and new venture creation," Economia e Politica Industriale: Journal of Industrial and Business Economics, Springer;Associazione Amici di Economia e Politica Industriale, vol. 43(4), pages 357-381, December.
    3. Sameeksha Desai, 2016. "Measuring entrepreneurship: Type, motivation, and growth," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 327-327, December.
    4. Erik E. Lehmann & Matthias Menter, 2016. "University–industry collaboration and regional wealth," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 41(6), pages 1284-1307, December.
    5. repec:eee:respol:v:48:y:2019:i:1:p:298-311 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Corradini, Carlo & De Propris, Lisa, 2017. "Beyond local search: Bridging platforms and inter-sectoral technological integration," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 196-206.
    7. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:6:p:1796-:d:149669 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Margaret Blume-Kohout & Krishna Kumar & Christopher Lau & Neeraj Sood, 2015. "The effect of federal research funding on formation of university-firm biopharmaceutical alliances," The Journal of Technology Transfer, Springer, vol. 40(5), pages 859-876, October.
    9. repec:kap:jtecht:v:43:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10961-017-9626-4 is not listed on IDEAS

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