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Coordination and transfer

Author

Listed:
  • David J. Cooper

    () (Florida State University)

  • John Van Huyck

    (Texas A&M University)

Abstract

Abstract We study the ability of subjects to transfer principles between related coordination games. Subjects play a class of order statistic coordination games closely related to the well-known minimum (or weak-link) and median games (Van Huyck et al. in Am Econ Rev 80:234–248, 1990, Q J Econ 106(3):885–910, 1991). When subjects play a random sequence of games with differing order statistics, play is less sensitive to the order statistic than when a fixed order statistic is used throughout. This is consistent with the prediction of a simple learning model with transfer. If subjects play a series of similar stag hunt games, play converges to the payoff dominant equilibrium when a convention emerges, replicating the main result of Rankin et al. (Games Econ Behav 32:315–337, 2000). When these subjects subsequently play a random sequence of order statistic games, play is shifted towards the payoff dominant equilibrium relative to subjects without previous experience. The data is consistent with subjects absorbing a general principle, play of the payoff dominant equilibrium, and applying it in a new related setting.

Suggested Citation

  • David J. Cooper & John Van Huyck, 2018. "Coordination and transfer," Experimental Economics, Springer;Economic Science Association, vol. 21(3), pages 487-512, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:expeco:v:21:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10683-017-9521-8
    DOI: 10.1007/s10683-017-9521-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Coordination; Transfer; Learning;

    JEL classification:

    • C90 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - General
    • C92 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Group Behavior
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games

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