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Principles for a Global Deal for Limiting the Risks from Climate Change

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  • Dimitri Zenghelis
  • Nicholas Stern

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  • Dimitri Zenghelis & Nicholas Stern, 2009. "Principles for a Global Deal for Limiting the Risks from Climate Change," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 43(3), pages 307-311, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:43:y:2009:i:3:p:307-311
    DOI: 10.1007/s10640-009-9277-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jane Ellis & Sami Kamel, 2007. "Overcoming Barriers to Clean Development Mechanism Projects," OECD Papers, OECD Publishing, vol. 7(1), pages 1-50.
    2. Nicholas Stern, 2008. "The Economics of Climate Change," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(2), pages 1-37, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Al Khourdajie, Alaa & Finus, Michael, 2020. "Measures to enhance the effectiveness of international climate agreements: The case of border carbon adjustments," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 124(C).
    2. Simon Dietz & David Maddison, 2009. "New Frontiers in the Economics of Climate Change," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 43(3), pages 295-306, July.
    3. Sturla F. Kvamsdal & Ivan Belik & Arnt Ove Hopland & Yuanhao Li, 2021. "A Machine Learning Analysis of the Recent Environmental and Resource Economics Literature," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 79(1), pages 93-115, May.
    4. Pandit, Ram & Neupane, Prem Raj & Wagle, Bishnu Hari, 2017. "Economics of carbon sequestration in community forests: Evidence from REDD+ piloting in Nepal," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(C), pages 9-29.
    5. Frank Jotzo & Steve Hatfield-Dodds, 2011. "Price Floors in Emissions Trading to Reduce Policy Related Investment Risks: an Australian View," CCEP Working Papers 1105, Centre for Climate & Energy Policy, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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