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Valuation in the Lab

  • Jason Shogren

    ()

Experimental methods have proven useful to explore the power and limits to nonmarket valuation through stated preference methods. We now understand better how people learn about and react to the incentives, institutions, and information created by surveys. This paper briefly reviews topics in experimental valuation, including ex ante bias corrections, ex post bias calibration, and examining the circumstances that strengthen or weaken the economist’s presumption of rational valuation. Copyright Springer 2006

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10640-005-3785-8
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Article provided by European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists in its journal Environmental and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 34 (2006)
Issue (Month): 1 (05)
Pages: 163-172

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Handle: RePEc:kap:enreec:v:34:y:2006:i:1:p:163-172
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springerlink.com/link.asp?id=100263

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  1. Smith, V. Kerry & Mansfield, Carol, 1996. "Buying Time: Real and Hypothetical Offers," Working Papers 96-04, Duke University, Department of Economics.
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  17. Knetsch, Jack L & Sinden, J A, 1984. "Willingness to Pay and Compensation Demanded: Experimental Evidence of an Unexpected Disparity in Measures of Value," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 99(3), pages 507-21, August.
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  20. repec:eap:articl:v:13:y:1983:i:1:p:2-17 is not listed on IDEAS
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