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The Lives of Others: Predicting Donations with Non-Choice Responses

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  • Jeffrey Naecker

    () (Stanford University)

Abstract

There is significant variation in the percentage of adults registered as organ donors across the United States. Some of this variation may be due to characteristics of the sign-up process, in particular the form that is used when state residents renew or apply for their driver’s licenses. However, it is difficult to model and predict the success of the different forms with typical methods, due to the exceptionally large feature space and the limited data. To surmount this problem, I apply a methodology that uses data on subjective non-choice reactions to predict choices. I find that active (ie yes-no) framing of the designation question decreases designation rates by 2-3 percentage points relative to an opt-in framing. Additionally, I show that this methodology can predict behavior in an experimental setting involving social motives where we have good structural benchmarks. More generally, this methodology can be used to perform policy pseudo-experiments where field experiments would prove prohibitively expensive or difficult.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeffrey Naecker, 2015. "The Lives of Others: Predicting Donations with Non-Choice Responses," Discussion Papers 15-021, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:sip:dpaper:15-021
    as

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    File URL: http://www-siepr.stanford.edu/repec/sip/15-021.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Katz, Jonathan H. & Katz, Gabriel, "undated". "Correcting for survey misreports using auxiliary information with an application to estimating turnout," Working Papers 1294, California Institute of Technology, Division of the Humanities and Social Sciences.
    2. Gary Charness & Matthew Rabin, 2002. "Understanding Social Preferences with Simple Tests," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 117(3), pages 817-869.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Organ donation; social preferences; lab experiment.;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household
    • Q51 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Valuation of Environmental Effects

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