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Does tourism cause growth asymmetrically in a panel of G-7 countries? A short note

Author

Listed:
  • Abdulnasser Hatemi-J

    () (United Arab Emirates University)

  • Rangan Gupta

    (University of Pretoria)

  • Axel Kasongo

    (University of Pretoria)

  • Thabo Mboweni

    (University of Pretoria)

  • Ndivhuho Netshitenzhe

    (University of Pretoria)

Abstract

We analyse whether tourism (measured by real tourism receipts) causes growth in an asymmetric fashion in a panel of G-7 countries over the period of 1995–2014. Our results reveal that the tourism-led growth hypothesis holds for France, Germany, and the US, with negative tourism shocks being more important for Germany, Italy, Japan, while positive shocks are more important in UK and the US. Our results imply that, policy makers in Germany, Italy and Japan should be more concerned when tourism receipts decline.

Suggested Citation

  • Abdulnasser Hatemi-J & Rangan Gupta & Axel Kasongo & Thabo Mboweni & Ndivhuho Netshitenzhe, 2018. "Does tourism cause growth asymmetrically in a panel of G-7 countries? A short note," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 45(1), pages 49-57, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:empiri:v:45:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10663-016-9345-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s10663-016-9345-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Eric Olabode Olabisi, 2018. "Revisiting the Tourism-Economic Growth Nexus: The Case of Economic Community of West African States," Izvestiya, Varna University of Economics, issue 1, pages 21-30.
    2. Umit Bulut & Emrah Kocak & Courtney Suess, 2020. "The effect of freedom on international tourism demand: Empirical evidence from the top eight most visited countries," Tourism Economics, , vol. 26(8), pages 1358-1373, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic growth; Tourism receipts; Asymmetric panel causality test;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects
    • L83 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Sports; Gambling; Restaurants; Recreation; Tourism

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