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Money-price relation in Malaysia: has it disappeared or strengthened?

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  • Mansor Ibrahim

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Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Mansor Ibrahim, 2010. "Money-price relation in Malaysia: has it disappeared or strengthened?," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 43(4), pages 303-322, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:ecopln:v:43:y:2010:i:4:p:303-322
    DOI: 10.1007/s10644-010-9097-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ramon Moreno & Reuven Glick, 2001. "Is money still useful for policy in East Asia?," Pacific Basin Working Paper Series 2001-12, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
    2. Huayu Sun & Yue Ma, 2004. "Money and price relationship in China," Journal of Chinese Economic and Business Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 2(3), pages 225-247.
    3. Friedman, Benjamin M. & Kuttner, Kenneth N., 1993. "Another look at the evidence on money-income causality," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 57(1-3), pages 189-203.
    4. Lawrence J. Christiano & Terry J. Fitzgerald, 2003. "The Band Pass Filter," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(2), pages 435-465, May.
    5. Nicoletti-Altimari, Sergio, 2001. "Does money lead inflation in the euro area?," Working Paper Series 0063, European Central Bank.
    6. Abul M.M. Masih & Rumi Masih, 1998. "Does money cause prices, or the other way around?: Multi-country econometric evidence including error-correction modelling from South-east Asia," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 25(3), pages 138-160, September.
    7. Sushanta K. Mallick & Mohammed Mohsin, 2007. "On the Effects of Inflation Shocks in a Small Open Economy," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 40(3), pages 253-266, September.
    8. Harding, Don & Pagan, Adrian, 2002. "Dissecting the cycle: a methodological investigation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 365-381, March.
    9. Mohsen Bahmani-Oskooee & Hafez Rehman, 2005. "Stability of the money demand function in Asian developing countries," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(7), pages 773-792.
    10. Johansen, Soren, 1988. "Statistical analysis of cointegration vectors," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 231-254.
    11. Batini, Nicoletta & Nelson, Edward, 2001. "The Lag from Monetary Policy Actions to Inflation: Friedman Revisited," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 4(3), pages 381-400, Winter.
    12. Sofia Gouveia & Leonida Correia, 2008. "Business cycle synchronisation in the Euro area: the case of small countries," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 103-121, July.
    13. Bryon Higgins, 1992. "Policy implications of recent M2 behavior," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q III, pages 21-36.
    14. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
    15. Friedman, Benjamin M, 1988. "Monetary Policy without Quantity Variables," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(2), pages 440-445, May.
    16. J. A. Cacy, 1985. "Recent M1 growth and its implications," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Dec, pages 18-23.
    17. Stephen M. Goldfeld, 1976. "The Case of the Missing Money," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 7(3), pages 683-740.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Money-price link; Cross correlations; Concordance index; VAR analysis; Malaysia; E31; E52;

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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