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Does the option market produce superior forecasts of noise-corrected volatility measures?

Author

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  • Gael M. Martin

    (Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)

  • Andrew Reidy

    (Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)

  • Jill Wright

    (Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia)

Abstract

This paper assesses the robustness of the relative performance of spot- and options-based volatility forecasts to the treatment of microstructure noise. Robustness of the results to the method of constructing option-implied forecasts is also investigated. Using a test for superior predictive ability, model-free implied volatility, which exploits information in the volatility 'smile', and at-the-money implied volatility, which does not, are both tested as benchmark forecasts of a range of alternative volatility proxies. The results provide compelling evidence against the model-free forecast for three Dow Jones Industrial Average stocks, over a 2001-2006 evaluation period. In contrast, the at-the-money implied volatility forecast is given strong support for the three equities over this period. Neither benchmark is supported for the S&P500 index. Importantly, the main qualitative results are invariant to the method of noise correction used in measuring future volatility. Copyright © 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Gael M. Martin & Andrew Reidy & Jill Wright, 2009. "Does the option market produce superior forecasts of noise-corrected volatility measures?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(1), pages 77-104.
  • Handle: RePEc:jae:japmet:v:24:y:2009:i:1:p:77-104
    DOI: 10.1002/jae.1033
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    Cited by:

    1. Ng, Jason & Forbes, Catherine S. & Martin, Gael M. & McCabe, Brendan P.M., 2013. "Non-parametric estimation of forecast distributions in non-Gaussian, non-linear state space models," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 411-430.
    2. Barunik, Jozef & Barunikova, Michaela, 2015. "Revisiting the long memory dynamics of implied-realized volatility relation: A new evidence from wavelet band spectrum regression," FinMaP-Working Papers 43, Collaborative EU Project FinMaP - Financial Distortions and Macroeconomic Performance: Expectations, Constraints and Interaction of Agents.
    3. Worapree Maneesoonthorn & Gael M. Martin & Catherine S. Forbes, 2017. "Dynamic Asset Price Jumps and the Performance of High Frequency Tests and Measures," Papers 1708.09520, arXiv.org.
    4. Maneesoonthorn, Worapree & Martin, Gael M. & Forbes, Catherine S. & Grose, Simone D., 2012. "Probabilistic forecasts of volatility and its risk premia," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 171(2), pages 217-236.
    5. Le-Yu Chen & Jerzy Szroeter, 2009. "Hypothesis testing of multiple inequalities: the method of constraint chaining," CeMMAP working papers CWP13/09, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    6. Jozef Barunik & Michaela Barunikova, 2012. "Revisiting the fractional cointegrating dynamics of implied-realized volatility relation with wavelet band spectrum regression," Papers 1208.4831, arXiv.org, revised Feb 2013.
    7. Baruník, Jozef & Hlínková, Michaela, 2016. "Revisiting the long memory dynamics of the implied–realized volatility relationship: New evidence from the wavelet regression," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 503-514.
    8. repec:eee:intfor:v:33:y:2017:i:4:p:848-863 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Gonzalez-Perez, Maria T., 2015. "Model-free volatility indexes in the financial literature: A review," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 141-159.
    10. Worapree Maneesoonthorn & Gael M. Martin & Catherine S. Forbes, 2017. "Dynamic asset price jumps and the performance of high frequency tests and measures," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 14/17, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.
    11. Taylor, Stephen J. & Yadav, Pradeep K. & Zhang, Yuanyuan, 2010. "The information content of implied volatilities and model-free volatility expectations: Evidence from options written on individual stocks," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 871-881, April.

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    JEL classification:

    • C10 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - General
    • C53 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Forecasting and Prediction Models; Simulation Methods
    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates

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