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Using High-Frequency Data in Dynamic Portfolio Choice

Author

Listed:
  • Federico Bandi
  • Jeffrey Russell
  • Yinghua Zhu

Abstract

This article evaluates the economic benefit of methods that have been suggested to optimally sample (in an MSE sense) high-frequency return data for the purpose of realized variance/covariance estimation in the presence of market microstructure noise (Bandi and Russell, 2005a, 2008). We compare certainty equivalents derived from volatility-timing trading strategies relying on optimally-sampled realized variances and covariances, on realized variances and covariances obtained by sampling every 5 minutes, and on realized variances and covariances obtained by sampling every 15 minutes. In our sample, we show that a risk-averse investor who is given the option of choosing variance/covariance forecasts derived from MSE-based optimal sampling methods versus forecasts obtained from 5- and 15-minute intervals (as generally proposed in the literature) would be willing to pay up to about 80 basis points per year to achieve the level of utility that is guaranteed by optimal sampling. We find that the gains yielded by optimal sampling are economically large, statistically significant, and robust to realistic transaction costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Federico Bandi & Jeffrey Russell & Yinghua Zhu, 2008. "Using High-Frequency Data in Dynamic Portfolio Choice," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1-3), pages 163-198.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:emetrv:v:27:y:2008:i:1-3:p:163-198
    DOI: 10.1080/07474930701870461
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Nikolaus Hautsch & Lada M. Kyj & Peter Malec, 2015. "Do High‐Frequency Data Improve High‐Dimensional Portfolio Allocations?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(2), pages 263-290, March.
    2. Qianqiu Liu, 2009. "On portfolio optimization: How and when do we benefit from high-frequency data?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(4), pages 560-582.
    3. Andersen, Torben G. & Bollerslev, Tim & Meddahi, Nour, 2011. "Realized volatility forecasting and market microstructure noise," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 160(1), pages 220-234, January.
    4. repec:ipg:wpaper:2014-053 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Fulvio Corsi & Francesco Audrino, 2012. "Realized Covariance Tick-by-Tick in Presence of Rounded Time Stamps and General Microstructure Effects," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 10(4), pages 591-616, September.
    6. Tim Bollerslev & Andrew J. Patton & Rogier Quaedvlieg, 2016. "Modeling and Forecasting (Un)Reliable Realized Covariances for More Reliable Financial Decisions," CREATES Research Papers 2016-10, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    7. Nolte, Ingmar & Xu, Qi, 2015. "The economic value of volatility timing with realized jumps," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 45-59.
    8. Torben G. Andersen & Viktor Todorov, 2009. "Realized Volatility and Multipower Variation," CREATES Research Papers 2009-49, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    9. Vortelinos, Dimitrios I. & Lakshmi, Geeta, 2015. "Market risk of BRIC Eurobonds in the financial crisis period," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 295-310.
    10. repec:gam:jecnmx:v:5:y:2017:i:4:p:54-:d:122391 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Gael M. Martin & Andrew Reidy & Jill Wright, 2009. "Does the option market produce superior forecasts of noise-corrected volatility measures?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(1), pages 77-104.
    12. Phan, Dinh Hoang Bach & Sharma, Susan Sunila & Narayan, Paresh Kumar, 2016. "Intraday volatility interaction between the crude oil and equity markets," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 1-13.
    13. Sergey Lototsky & Henry Schellhorn & Ran Zhao, 2016. "A String Model of Liquidity in Financial Markets," Papers 1608.05900, arXiv.org, revised Apr 2018.
    14. Boudt, Kris & Cornelissen, Jonathan & Croux, Christophe, 2012. "Jump robust daily covariance estimation by disentangling variance and correlation components," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 56(11), pages 2993-3005.
    15. Audrino, Francesco, 2014. "Forecasting correlations during the late-2000s financial crisis: The short-run component, the long-run component, and structural breaks," Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 43-60.
    16. Sévi, Benoît, 2014. "Forecasting the volatility of crude oil futures using intraday data," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 235(3), pages 643-659.
    17. Audrino, Francesco, 2011. "Forecasting correlations during the late-2000s financial crisis: short-run component, long-run component, and structural breaks," Economics Working Paper Series 1112, University of St. Gallen, School of Economics and Political Science.
    18. Ubukata, Masato & Watanabe, Toshiaki, 2015. "Evaluating the performance of futures hedging using multivariate realized volatility," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 148-171.
    19. Lucey, Brian & Sevic, Aleksandar, 2010. "Investigating the determinants of banking coexceedances in Europe in the summer of 2008," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 275-283, July.
    20. Michael Johannes & Arthur Korteweg & Nicholas Polson, 2014. "Sequential Learning, Predictability, and Optimal Portfolio Returns," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(2), pages 611-644, April.
    21. Bandi, Federico M. & Russell, Jeffrey R. & Yang, Chen, 2008. "Realized volatility forecasting and option pricing," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 147(1), pages 34-46, November.
    22. repec:sbe:breart:v:35:y:2015:i:1:a:21453 is not listed on IDEAS

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