IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Log in (now much improved!) to save this article

Realized volatility forecasting and option pricing

  • Bandi, Federico M.
  • Russell, Jeffrey R.
  • Yang, Chen
Registered author(s):

    A growing literature advocates the use of microstructure noise-contaminated high-frequency data for the purpose of volatility estimation. This paper evaluates and compares the quality of several recently-proposed estimators in the context of a relevant economic metric, i.e., profits from option pricing and trading. Using forecasts obtained by virtue of alternative volatility estimates, agents price short-term options on the S&P 500 index before trading with each other at average prices. The agents' average profits and the Sharpe ratios of the profits constitute the criteria used to evaluate alternative volatility estimates and the corresponding forecasts. For our data, we find that estimators with superior finite sample Mean-squared-error properties generate higher average profits and higher Sharpe ratios, in general. We confirm that, even from a forecasting standpoint, there is scope for optimizing the finite sample properties of alternative volatility estimators as advocated by Bandi and Russell [Bandi, F.M., Russell, J.R., 2005. Market microstructure noise, integrated variance estimators, and the accuracy of asymptotic approximations. Working Paper; Bandi, F.M., Russell, J.R., 2008b. Microstructure noise, realized variance, and optimal sampling. Review of Economic Studies 75, 339-369] in recent work.

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304-4076(08)00122-X
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Econometrics.

    Volume (Year): 147 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 1 (November)
    Pages: 34-46

    as
    in new window

    Handle: RePEc:eee:econom:v:147:y:2008:i:1:p:34-46
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jeconom

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

    as in new window
    1. Edwin J. Elton, 2002. "Spiders: Where Are the Bugs?," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 75(3), pages 453-472, July.
    2. Norman R. Swanson & Valentina Corradi & Walter Distaso, 2011. "Predictive Inference for Integrated Volatility," Departmental Working Papers 201109, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    3. Michael McAleer & Marcelo Medeiros, 2008. "Realized Volatility: A Review," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1-3), pages 10-45.
    4. Aït-Sahalia, Yacine & Mancini, Loriano, 2008. "Out of sample forecasts of quadratic variation," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 147(1), pages 17-33, November.
    5. Anderson, Torben G. & Bollerslev, Tim & Diebold, Francis X. & Labys, Paul, 2002. "Modeling and Forecasting Realized Volatility," Working Papers 02-12, Duke University, Department of Economics.
    6. Eric Ghysels & Pedro Santa-Clara & Rossen Valkanov, 2004. "Predicting Volatility: Getting the Most out of Return Data Sampled at Different Frequencies," NBER Working Papers 10914, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Zhou, Bin, 1996. "High-Frequency Data and Volatility in Foreign-Exchange Rates," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 14(1), pages 45-52, January.
    8. Kalnina, Ilze & Linton, Oliver, 2008. "Estimating quadratic variation consistently in the presence of endogenous and diurnal measurement error," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 147(1), pages 47-59, November.
    9. Ole E. Barndorff-Nielsen & Neil Shephard, 2000. "Econometric analysis of realised volatility and its use in estimating stochastic volatility models," Economics Papers 2001-W4, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford, revised 05 Jul 2001.
    10. Jeff Fleming, 2001. "The Economic Value of Volatility Timing," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 56(1), pages 329-352, 02.
    11. West, Kenneth D. & Edison, Hali J. & Cho, Dongchul, 1993. "A utility-based comparison of some models of exchange rate volatility," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1-2), pages 23-45, August.
    12. Andersen, Torben G. & Bollerslev, Tim & Diebold, Francis X. & Ebens, Heiko, 2001. "The distribution of realized stock return volatility," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 43-76, July.
    13. Peter Reinhard Hansen & Asger Lunde, 2005. "A Realized Variance for the Whole Day Based on Intermittent High-Frequency Data," Journal of Financial Econometrics, Society for Financial Econometrics, vol. 3(4), pages 525-554.
    14. F. M. Bandi & J. R. Russell, 2008. "Microstructure Noise, Realized Variance, and Optimal Sampling," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 75(2), pages 339-369.
    15. Hansen, Peter R. & Lunde, Asger, 2006. "Realized Variance and Market Microstructure Noise," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 24, pages 127-161, April.
    16. Robert F. Engle & Che-Hsiung Hong & Alex Kane, 1990. "Valuation of Variance Forecast with Simulated Option Markets," NBER Working Papers 3350, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    17. Zhang, Lan & Mykland, Per A. & Ait-Sahalia, Yacine, 2005. "A Tale of Two Time Scales: Determining Integrated Volatility With Noisy High-Frequency Data," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 100, pages 1394-1411, December.
    18. Bauer Daniel & Börger Matthias & Ruß Jochen & Zwiesler Hans-Joachim, 2008. "The Volatility of Mortality," Asia-Pacific Journal of Risk and Insurance, De Gruyter, vol. 3(1), pages 1-29, September.
    19. Federico Bandi & Jeffrey Russell & Yinghua Zhu, 2008. "Using High-Frequency Data in Dynamic Portfolio Choice," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1-3), pages 163-198.
    20. Roel Oomen, 2004. "Properties of Bias Corrected Realized Variance Under Alternative Sampling Schemes," Working Papers wp04-15, Warwick Business School, Finance Group.
    21. Bandi, Federico M. & Russell, Jeffrey R., 2006. "Separating microstructure noise from volatility," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(3), pages 655-692, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:econom:v:147:y:2008:i:1:p:34-46. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei)

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.