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Moving up the income ladder? What are the obstacles: a case study of indigenous people in Latin America

Author

Listed:
  • Ivan Grguric

    (Faculty of Economics, Zagreb)

Abstract

Latin America is traditionally the region with the highest income and wealth inequality and the indigenous people are the most socially excluded group of the society. The obstacles they face on their way to becoming middle class are numerous. Markets sometimes operate in an anti-poor way, e.g. capital market imperfections. Next, many Latin American countries are agrarian societies with high land inequality. Also, indigenous people continue to have lower health and education indicators. Possible solutions should include state intervention in providing easier access to credit for the indigenous, land reform, health and education systems that are more universal and better targeting of social transfers.

Suggested Citation

  • Ivan Grguric, 2005. "Moving up the income ladder? What are the obstacles: a case study of indigenous people in Latin America," Financial Theory and Practice, Institute of Public Finance, vol. 29(4), pages 361-381.
  • Handle: RePEc:ipf:finteo:v:29:y:2005:i:4:p:361-381
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    File URL: http://www.ijf.hr/eng/FTP/2005/4/grguric.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Oded Galor & Joseph Zeira, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52.
    4. Francine D. Blau & John W. Graham, 1990. "Black-White Differences in Wealth and Asset Composition," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 105(2), pages 321-339.
    5. Banerjee, Abhijit V & Newman, Andrew F, 1993. "Occupational Choice and the Process of Development," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(2), pages 274-298, April.
    6. George A. Akerlof, 1997. "Social Distance and Social Decisions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(5), pages 1005-1028, September.
    7. World Bank, 2004. "Ecuador : Poverty Assessment," World Bank Other Operational Studies 14593, The World Bank.
    8. Durlauf, S.N. & Cooper, S.J. & Johnson, P.A., 1993. "On the Evolution of Economic Status Across Generations," Working papers 9329, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    indigenous people; poverty; Latin America.;

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean

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