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Market Structure, Technology Spillovers, and Persistence in Productivity Differentials

  • Yin-Wong Cheung
  • Antonio Garcia Pascual

    (University of California - Santa Cruz and International Monetary Fund)

Using data from 11 manufacturing industries in 17 OECD countries, this paper empirically investigates the determinants of cross-country differences in the persistence of productivity differentials. Specifically, the paper focuses on the effects of product market structure and technology diffusion. It is found that the manufacturing industries display a wide range of convergence rates. Consistent with theories, the persistence of productivity differentials is found to be positively correlated with the price-cost margin—the proxy for market monopolistic behavior. The proxies for technology diffusion, however, do not exhibit consistently significant effect. Among the conditioning macro variables, productivity convergence appears to be enhanced by human capital but deterred by government spending.

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File URL: http://www2.selu.edu/orgs/ijae/Journal%201/IJAE%20Sept%202004%20A1%20Cheung%20Garcia%20Pascual%20%2009%2024%2004%20RV4.pdf
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Article provided by Department of General Business, Southeastern Louisiana University in its journal The International Journal of Applied Economics.

Volume (Year): 1 (2004)
Issue (Month): 1 (September)
Pages: 1-23

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Handle: RePEc:ija:ancoec:v:1:y:2004:i:1:p:1-23
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  1. Barro, R.J., 1989. "Economic Growth In A Cross Section Of Countries," RCER Working Papers 201, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  2. Aghion, P. & Howitt, P., 1990. "A Model Of Growth Through Creative Destruction," DELTA Working Papers 90-12, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
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  7. Aghion, Philippe & Harris, Christopher & Vickers, John, 1997. "Competition and growth with step-by-step innovation: An example," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(3-5), pages 771-782, April.
  8. Barro, Robert J. & Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1995. "Technological Diffusion, Convergence and Growth," CEPR Discussion Papers 1255, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Blundell, Richard & Griffith, Rachel & Van Reenen, John, 1995. "Dynamic Count Data Models of Technological Innovation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(429), pages 333-44, March.
  10. Bernard, A.B. & Jones, C.I., 1993. "Productivity Across Industries and Countries: Time Series Theory and Evidence," Working papers 93-17, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  11. Lee Branstetter, 2000. "Is Foreign Direct Investment a Channel of Knowledge Spillovers? Evidence from Japan's FDI in the United States," NBER Working Papers 8015, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Baumol, William J & Wolff, Edward N, 1988. "Productivity Growth, Convergence, and Welfare: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(5), pages 1155-59, December.
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