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Market Structure, Technology Spillovers, and Persistence in Productivity Differentials

Author

Listed:
  • Yin-Wong Cheung
  • Antonio Garcia Pascual

    (University of California - Santa Cruz and International Monetary Fund)

Abstract

Using data from 11 manufacturing industries in 17 OECD countries, this paper empirically investigates the determinants of cross-country differences in the persistence of productivity differentials. Specifically, the paper focuses on the effects of product market structure and technology diffusion. It is found that the manufacturing industries display a wide range of convergence rates. Consistent with theories, the persistence of productivity differentials is found to be positively correlated with the price-cost margin—the proxy for market monopolistic behavior. The proxies for technology diffusion, however, do not exhibit consistently significant effect. Among the conditioning macro variables, productivity convergence appears to be enhanced by human capital but deterred by government spending.

Suggested Citation

  • Yin-Wong Cheung & Antonio Garcia Pascual, 2004. "Market Structure, Technology Spillovers, and Persistence in Productivity Differentials," The International Journal of Applied Economics, Department of General Business, Southeastern Louisiana University, vol. 1(1), pages 1-23, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ija:ancoec:v:1:y:2004:i:1:p:1-23
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1992. "A Model of Growth through Creative Destruction," Econometrica, Econometric Society, pages 323-351.
    2. Bernard, Andrew B & Jones, Charles I, 1996. "Productivity across Industries and Countries: Time Series Theory and Evidence," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(1), pages 135-146, February.
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    4. Barro, Robert J & Sala-i-Martin, Xavier, 1997. "Technological Diffusion, Convergence, and Growth," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 1-26, March.
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    7. Blundell, Richard & Griffith, Rachel & Van Reenen, John, 1995. "Dynamic Count Data Models of Technological Innovation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 105(429), pages 333-344, March.
    8. Baumol, William J & Wolff, Edward N, 1988. "Productivity Growth, Convergence, and Welfare: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 78(5), pages 1155-1159, December.
    9. Lee Branstetter, 2000. "Is Foreign Direct Investment a Channel of Knowledge Spillovers? Evidence from Japan's FDI in the United States," NBER Working Papers 8015, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Renaud Bourlès & Gilbert Cette & Jimmy Lopez & Jacques Mairesse & Giuseppe Nicoletti, 2013. "Do Product Market Regulations In Upstream Sectors Curb Productivity Growth? Panel Data Evidence For OECD Countries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(5), pages 1750-1768, December.
    2. Giuseppe Nicoletti & Stefano Scarpetta, 2003. "Regulation, productivity and growth: OECD evidence," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 18(36), pages 9-72, April.
    3. Anabel Zárate-Marco & Jaime Vallés-Giménez, 2012. "The cost of regulation in a decentralized context: the case of the Spanish regions," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 185-203, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Total factor productivity; convergence; market structure; technology diffusion;

    JEL classification:

    • R00 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General - - - General
    • Z0 - Other Special Topics - - General

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